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1038355 Posts in 41961 Topics- by 33586 Members - Latest Member: VitruvianNick

September 02, 2014, 03:44:15 PM
TIGSource ForumsDeveloperCreativeDesignGame Design Books... Recommendations?
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radioact1ve
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« Reply #45 on: March 02, 2011, 06:46:54 PM »

Wow, great books to add to my list! One I would like to throw out there, while note specifically with game design its interesting nonetheless.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man,_Play_and_Games
Pretty deep stuff into the human and society aspect of games/play in general. Half way through and its pretty cool.
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dmizzle
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« Reply #46 on: March 20, 2011, 01:05:26 AM »

I would like to recommend Game Design - Secrets of the Sages 2nd Edition by Marc Saltzman. I know it's an older book and some of the things in there are going to be a little dated (it contains a chapter on the "Shareware Revolution"!), but it contains interviews with Shigeru Miyamoto, Sid Meier and a bunch of other prolific designers.

It's definitely great to have for the interviews alone but there are some tips in there that I have been able to apply.

You'll probably be able to find it on ebay or alibris dot com (sorry, didn't know if I was allowed to link or not).
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MrMog
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« Reply #47 on: April 05, 2011, 05:31:28 PM »

I'm reading "Challenges for Game Designers" by Brenda Brathwaite and Ian Schreiber

http://www.amazon.com/Challenges-Game-Designers-Brenda-Brathwaite/dp/158450580X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1302052735&sr=8-1

It's a nice compliment to the other books people have suggested thanks to it's more practical tone. That and the challenges are quite fun to do as well.
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mirosurabu
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« Reply #48 on: April 06, 2011, 07:20:48 PM »

Yeah... In my mind - if you've played games your whole life, and you've analysed them during and since.. what are these guys gonna know that you're not? (apart from how to write it in a way that is acceptable for publishing in a book).. You have 20+ years of experience in the area (depending on your age, etc..etc..)

Probably the best thing to do is play some shitty games. It helps. You can learn as much from mistakes as you can successes.

Old post is old, but want to say this anyways:

I think game designers do more than just play and analyze video games. There is great deal of proper science behind game design that most people playing and analyzing games don't do. This is the advantage that experienced game designers have over novice designers. They know that there are two sides to game design: the one which is about knowing what you like, knowing what you hate and using your imagination to come up with experiences that are equally or more powerful than existing ones and there is this other side to game design which is about effectively communicating these experiences. Now, I'm tempted to call the first one "the artistic side" and the second one "the scientific side" but it's hard to draw the line, so I'll back off. What I want to say is that the second one is clearly more scientific since it requires careful testing, which is playtesting. The knowledge professional game designers gain through playtesting and the knowledge they derive from that knowledge is what's almost exclusive to them and that's where the value of design books is.


Novice game designers don't playtest. They say they make games for themselves, so testing is unnecessary. But, that's a common lie - you never make games for yourself, you will rarely enjoy games you make because your game has been spoiled to you in the long process of development. What you really are doing is making games for those who are like you, and that's perfectly fine! It's quite likely that experience you are designing is so awesome that there is minority or maybe even majority of people that will like it, but you still have to communicate it properly. So, um, how do you do that? I mean, how do you learn to do it properly? You learn it through serious science which is playtesting or you read about it in books and then expend it through playtesting.

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Rudolf Kremers
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« Reply #49 on: September 20, 2013, 12:57:07 AM »

Stumbled on this thread and ermm realised that my book on level design is not mentioned.
Ahem. It's called "Level Design: Concept, Theory and Practice"

so... here is review*:

http://www.sci-fi-london.com/news/books/2012/08/level-design-concept-theory-and-practice


*Rather than me trying to act a used car salesman. ;-)
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xraven13
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« Reply #50 on: September 27, 2013, 01:10:13 AM »

I have been reading Art Of Game Design, and first few chapters was super informative, but if you have already lot of experience you will find some of the chapters after kinda useless. I still have to read the whole book. Also, I wouldn't recommend that you read it without developing, try to combine the two, it would be best you actually try to make few small games before reading it for real.
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