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April 24, 2014, 05:32:39 PM
TIGSource ForumsDeveloperTechnical (Moderators: Glaiel-Gamer, ThemsAllTook)Should I Use a Scripting Language
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Sunpeece
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« on: February 06, 2012, 10:39:09 PM »

Should I implement a majority of my code into a scripting language if I never intend to release community tools or make the project open source? Note: I do intend to have multiple developers.
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Geti
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« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2012, 10:56:02 PM »

Depends on the life of the project and whether you've got much experience with that sort of thing. More info needed really. What would you use scripting for?
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Sunpeece
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« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2012, 10:57:36 PM »

My project is iterable. It only gets bigger. I guess I don't really need it but I don't want to make the mistake of not using it if I actually do need it eventually.
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BlueSweatshirt
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« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2012, 11:50:27 PM »

Scripting is a tradeoff: flexibility over execution speed. Scripts have no compile time and you can sometimes even reload scripts while the game is still running, depending on how you set things up. Stuff like weak typed variables and such also tend to by handy for making games quickly-- less to worry about in the short run. However, if you have no idea how to use your scripting language and how to integrate that into your compiled code-base(written in C++ for example) then you'll quickly get lost and things will get messy.
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Geti
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« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2012, 11:52:26 PM »

Iterable now and you're just starting it or has existed for years and you've settled on it as a development focus and income generator? Things change a lot. Engines you design meticulously often end up getting used 3 times and then you realise a different approach is more effective to your coding style.

From all the questions you've been asking I assume it's more of the first thing and you're overengineering this thing Concerned
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flavio
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« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2012, 03:24:03 AM »

It depends on what is your project, exactly. If it is a (moddable) game then you'll need scripting (typically). If it is a middleware then you could make it with a compiled language, and add scripting in some future iteration (since scripting should just be used to drive the middleware, so it should not have strong relations with the internal architecture of the middleware).
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« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2012, 03:46:15 AM »

From all the questions you've been asking I assume it's more of the first thing and you're overengineering this thing Concerned
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Sunpeece
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« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2012, 12:29:56 PM »

From all the questions you've been asking I assume it's more of the first thing and you're overengineering this thing Concerned

Well I'm going to make a multiplayer game that should last as long as possible, and profit is not an objective.
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Impossible
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« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2012, 02:08:34 PM »

It's simple enough to add a lua vm to any C or C++ game that there is almost no reason not to, even if you don't end up using it that much it can be useful to hack in quick things without a rebuild and do configuration stuff.
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Daid
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« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2012, 02:36:43 PM »

Programming your whole game in a scripting language can become a huge mess if you don't set it up right. Especially because most scripting languages are so loosely typed.

I found it's best to program the core engine in something strict like C/C++/C#/Java and leave the "level specifics" to scripting engines. Scripted sequences for example, dialogs, are much easier to maintain in scripts. I think for enemy logic you might want to keep both options open, for easy enemies scripts are good. But once you have complex enemies like bosses that need to know a lot more about the game world you are better off inside your engine.
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