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April 24, 2014, 05:31:26 PM
TIGSource ForumsDeveloperCreativeDesignDealing with Development Burnout?
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theRaddRedd
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« Reply #15 on: November 13, 2012, 04:37:58 AM »

7 miles? All you do is walk and work?

Yup; I do some tech consulting. I play guitar every other day or so too, but yeah... Tired

EDIT: Before anyone thinks I'm some kind of legend, I only make the walk every few days now. It WAS everyday about a month ago, though.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2012, 04:56:28 AM by theRaddRedd » Logged

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Graham.
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« Reply #16 on: November 13, 2012, 04:39:09 AM »

Holy shit.
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J-Snake
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« Reply #17 on: November 13, 2012, 01:33:30 PM »

Quote
The main problem with working solo is that you don't have clear work boundaries.
and the main advantage is that you can work when you feel like it. i've been getting a lot more shit done and enjoying gamedev even more since i started doing that. it's not a question of how many hours you spend in front of the computer it's about how many of these hours you're actually being productive.
Amen.
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ஒழுக்கின்மை
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« Reply #18 on: November 13, 2012, 02:03:25 PM »

Limiting the workday: That actually sounds pretty genius. I never considered anything like that. What software do you guys recommend for tracking TOT?

i mentioned rescuetime to track time, but as an addition to that as a time-management method i'd suggest the pomodoro technique, with a physical/mechanical (not a digital) timer of some sort
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« Reply #19 on: November 13, 2012, 02:03:51 PM »

Quote
Keeping a devlog: That seems like it would just add to the work, wouldn't it? Or am I just looking at it the wrong way?

It is more work, but its a different kind, and (I've found) good for keeping motivated. Its also about diversifying your tasks a little bit.
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« Reply #20 on: November 13, 2012, 02:06:41 PM »

i don't find it more work at all. i keep a devlog every day and it takes 1-2 min to update it each day (i use livejournal for this purpose): http://rinku.livejournal.com is my devlog
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theRaddRedd
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« Reply #21 on: November 16, 2012, 02:12:25 PM »

Well, in that case, I've got a Tumblr already (ethanredd.tumblr.com). I guess I'll start updating that more often and see how it goes.

Thanks for all the great advice everyone  Coffee
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« Reply #22 on: November 18, 2012, 06:51:02 AM »

Limiting the workday: That actually sounds pretty genius. I never considered anything like that. What software do you guys recommend for tracking TOT?
I use hardware. It's called a "clock" Smiley A very simple device and easy to acquire, I have heard some people use it also for other purposes than development, but that might be just a rumour Smiley

Personally I find a clock better than software, because it's a physical thing. It does not belong to the software realm. It makes me more aware of the "exit from development mode" thing.
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« Reply #23 on: November 21, 2012, 01:40:20 PM »

Experiment with your optimum work session. For me this is about 1 to 2 hours. I can manage 2 or 3 of these "sessions" a day, with breaks in between. The down time allows you to subconsciously process what you did and prepare for next steps. Break down tasks into manageable pieces so you really feel like you accomplish something in each work session. For instance, instead of "I'm going to sit down and work on the ai for a bit", it's "for this session the ai is going to optimally choose between attack and retreat". Sitting down to work, accomplishing something, and then leaving it makes you feel productive and more excited for what the next step will be.

(And yeah, I realize this is pretty much pomodoro)
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J-Snake
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« Reply #24 on: November 21, 2012, 02:48:37 PM »

i don't find it more work at all. i keep a devlog every day and it takes 1-2 min to update it each day (i use livejournal for this purpose): http://rinku.livejournal.com is my devlog
What is actually the point of a devlog? What do you get from that personally?
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« Reply #25 on: November 21, 2012, 03:01:33 PM »

Hey RaddRedd, are you working from home?  One of the best bits of advice I could give you which comes from feedback from several friends I have who are full time indie as well as giving it a crack myself for a period is to not work from home.  Instead find some shared office space occupied by other creative indie types where you can rent a desk and work from there.  Doing so has lots of advantages:

- You'll pace yourself better since you're more likely to set reasonable work hours.

- Your work will be more productive since you'll have no home distractions and be in the right frame of mind in an office environment

- You'll be able to relax better at home since its completely separate from work which will let you be more focused when you do work

- Being around other creative folks will help to keep you motivated and inspired.

All in all its a much better solution for preventing burn out.
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theRaddRedd
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« Reply #26 on: November 21, 2012, 04:29:42 PM »

@motorherp - Yeah,I work at home. Sadly, I'm attached at the hip to my desktop. Hoping to upgrade to a laptop soon. Will take that advice about working elsewhere when I can, though; there's a few nice wifi cafes around where I live.

@Archibald - lol, I assumed everybody was using a software timer since you're already on a computer, but you got me there Wink
 
@jsnake - I like to share when I do something cool. It's nice when you get positive feedback too; I just don't like how long it takes to make worthwhile posts (hence why I love twitter and tumblr). btw, I always imagine you sounding like Bruce Lee, lol.

thx guys  Coffee
« Last Edit: November 23, 2012, 04:23:53 AM by theRaddRedd » Logged

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« Reply #27 on: November 22, 2012, 09:39:50 AM »

Yeah, agree with not working from home. If you still want to work from home, at least make a proper home office. Big enough table, proper lighting, decent seating. Furniture will cost you a bit, but you probably earn that money back in productivity.

Maybe I'll write an article on this later Tongue
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« Reply #28 on: November 27, 2012, 03:48:21 AM »

This has happened to me with my latest project.

I keep an 8 hour day job, and work on games in the evenings. On top of this i've got a family as well, so needless to say, there's a lot to do and little time to do it in.

When i was in heavy crunch time recently i felt totally burnt out, and fed up with the project.
What i did was just to take a full week off from the game project. I answered only a couple of emails that was needed for the upkeep, but nothing else.
After that week, i started slowly on the project again and increasing the time for each day but still kept at least a day of the week off from the project.

Doing this kept the flame burning for the game, and now i'm back to the normal pace and commitment again.
If i burn out again, this is probably the way i'm gonna handle it again.
But i hope it doesn't happen, after all - i'm very soon finished with it! =)
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Jˇhannes G.
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« Reply #29 on: November 27, 2012, 03:56:47 AM »

My suggestion (same as many other people are saying here) is basically take shorter work days. And take a lot of (planned) breaks. I have noticed that I manage to produce more in 2 hours with breaks thrown in every now and then (5 minute break every 20 minutes for example, or 20 minute break every 60 minute...) than if I would work nonstop for 3 hours. (unless on a VERY good day, but those are rare)

There have been talks in the media here in Iceland concerning the fact that Icelanders work most hours of all our neighboring countries but still manage to produce a lot less (per person). In other words, we work our arses off in a very inefficient way.

So yeah, take it easy, take breaks, step away from the computer and get some fresh air, don't overwork yourself.
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