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1056321 Posts in 42894 Topics- by 34846 Members - Latest Member: spirius

October 22, 2014, 11:56:44 PM
TIGSource ForumsPlayerGeneralGame Designer Kenji Eno Has Died
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Author Topic: Game Designer Kenji Eno Has Died  (Read 1855 times)
mrKaizen
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« Reply #20 on: February 26, 2013, 02:10:12 PM »

D scared the hell out of a really young me. I was bought it accidentally because my Mother thought it was Vampire Hunter D. Thank you for the nightmares.
ahahah sh** happens Wink
Tks for sharing, sometimes parents do terrible things. :D
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ALberto Doriguzzi Bozzo > mrKaizen
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mrKaizen
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« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2013, 05:13:43 AM »

Unpublished interview (only some quotes):

http://kotaku.com/5987522/kenji-eno-speaks-his-mind-in-this-unpublished-interview
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ALberto Doriguzzi Bozzo > mrKaizen
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Kolba
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« Reply #22 on: March 04, 2013, 03:32:38 AM »

Sad news. His was an original mind. As others have said, he seemed pretty restless, always wanting to try something new. The quote about curry is even funnier knowing that his company WARP, inc. actually released their own curry once. I remember a picture of the UK Saturn Mag's Japanese correspondent tucking into a plate in the name of good journalism.

It's interesting the learn about his history of developing games for the blind; he used elements of that in Enemy Zero. The aliens were invisible and could only be located by radar beeps, which changed in pitch based on their direction, and changed in frequency based on their distance. It remains one of the scariest games I've played.

This quote from the interview at 1up offers a good philosophy and seems particularly poignant now:

Quote
I have no interest in my own past -- like, what I did in the past, what sold, how much, and so on. And the same goes for other people; I have no interest in what other people did in the past. So, like, instead of working on something I did in the past, I would rather be working on something new. I want to move forward. You have a short life; you're going to die someday. So I don't want to waste my time looking back on something I did in the past. But if I get into a really critical situation where I'm forced to do that in order to make a living, I might do that. But until a critical situation comes up, I'm not interested in looking back. Life is short! There's no time to look back!
« Last Edit: March 04, 2013, 10:46:45 AM by BlueSkies » Logged
D-TurboKiller
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« Reply #23 on: March 04, 2013, 05:08:39 AM »

Man, I never heard of him, but I did know about the D games, which I never tried. They seemed quite interesting, but I never got around to playing 'em.

Sadly, it seems it's always the ones who give their very best to die first, while we remain with cranky old bastards whose only interest is milking their franchise as much as possible.

As for his philosophy, that's something I actually tried doing a lot, but I always end up frustrated due to personal problems, and never end up doing anything proper. You might say I'm in one of those so-called "critical situations".
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mrKaizen
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« Reply #24 on: March 14, 2013, 05:26:08 AM »

Ehi another gamasutra article a bit late:
http://gamasutra.com/view/news/188282/Kenji_Eno_A_voice_of_dissent_a_champion_for_creative_integrity.php#.UUHJtFe6xvJ

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C.A. Silbereisen
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« Reply #25 on: March 14, 2013, 06:32:05 AM »

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When Enemy Zero was finally released on the Saturn, he made a limited run of 20 special editions, and if you paid $2,000 for one, he would hand-deliver the game to you. They sold out immediately, and Eno drove his truck across Japan delivering games to his customers. He had always wanted to have a direct relationship with players of his games, and here now was a way. In the current day and age, this is a common high-tier Kickstarter reward hang out with the developers for a bit, and get your game hand-delivered. Eno did this in 1996.
i've never played any of his but i think this dude was the real deal
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