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1074157 Posts in 44040 Topics- by 36041 Members - Latest Member: FloriLou

December 22, 2014, 06:54:20 AM
TIGSource ForumsDeveloperCreativeDesignGood motion & touch controls
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Gimym JIMBERT
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« Reply #20 on: February 23, 2013, 04:59:17 PM »

Using the analogue for gestures is an interesting idea. I'm sure I've mentioned to you before that in my work I've spent a lot of time looking for deeper ways in which players can express themselves to the machine. For my current game players will learn to speak a language, converse with npcs etc. The idea is the same.

You have this really expressive way to communicate, with all these rules and context sensitive meanings. You roll them out to the users, and teach them through mechanics, then as they learn they get better at expressing themselves. What becomes a long thought process becomes automatic, and is used as a building block for more complex expressions.

I haven't spent time coming up with the most natural way to get ideas in through a controller. Using slight mouse movements, nuances in button press timings, analog gestures. All fair game.

Yeah I remember, I'm truly waiting to see what you will come with Smiley
Do you know game like sweaty palm or the act? they try something like that you should check.
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ILLOGICAL, random guy on internet, do not trust (lelebĉcülo dum borobürükiss) ! GЮЯЦ TФ ДЯSTӨTZҚД!
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« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2013, 05:27:17 PM »

Thanks. No I don't know those games.

I don't have an idea for the six-axis. Probably something with dense action controls, or expression of feeling, nuanced ideas. Like, you play normally, but as you tilt forward that's you getting angrier, and tilt to the left to be spontaneous. Your feelings layer on top of your actions. So every action you take is influenced by how you feel. Player must consider both. There's some permanence to each feeling: maximum anger, dissipates at a certain rate etc.

Or you just use it for combo execution, careful placement of actions.

The tough thing with Mario Kart is the co-dependency with the co-op players. They need to be in sync.
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Gimym JIMBERT
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« Reply #22 on: February 23, 2013, 05:35:42 PM »

new super mario Wii U has a great implementation of that, some platform were control by motion independently from the character, tilting tilt the platform which moved in that direction, especially interesting when there was multiples platforms and you had to jump from one controlled platform to another
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ILLOGICAL, random guy on internet, do not trust (lelebĉcülo dum borobürükiss) ! GЮЯЦ TФ ДЯSTӨTZҚД!
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Gimym JIMBERT
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« Reply #23 on: February 23, 2013, 05:41:21 PM »

The tough thing with Mario Kart is the co-dependency with the co-op players. They need to be in sync.

 Well, hello there! i would say this is the fun!
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ILLOGICAL, random guy on internet, do not trust (lelebĉcülo dum borobürükiss) ! GЮЯЦ TФ ДЯSTӨTZҚД!
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« Reply #24 on: February 23, 2013, 06:01:58 PM »

Tough to train the player for it. Always the bargain with codependency games.
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Graham-
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« Reply #25 on: February 24, 2013, 01:42:59 PM »

Not to say I'm against it. My second serious design - years ago - was all about codependency. You carried your partner like a backpack in an action platformer. Your partner could unhook, or carry you. The game was about using each other in interesting ways, but also relying on one another so players of diverse skill gaps could still cooperate.
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Gimym JIMBERT
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« Reply #26 on: February 24, 2013, 11:04:26 PM »

Actually it's not essential to the gameplay, it's bonus if you master it, i'm expending on my experience with double dash. The basic racing and "fighting" is enough but you can dig deeper to evade fringe situation.

It has many functions, you can goof with it (make the car dance), you can communicate (sending a signal to your parner or grief him for ignoring you), you can save the day for your partner mistake (just dodge that trap by influancing trajectory), etc...

It's design to have many layer of fun. It was typical nintendo design until the GC era. For example mario64 has 16 distinct jump (n^3 his previous number) depending on your playstyle many of them are (functionally) useless and many does literary the same things, it's a game about manipulating the character and having challenge as excuse to use them. Contrast to banjo kazooie which has a lot more varied and different movement but all of them are required to solve the many challenge, it's because the game is focus on the environment as obstacle. Zelda use to be the former but later zelda was more like banjo, pure locks and keys challenge.
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ILLOGICAL, random guy on internet, do not trust (lelebĉcülo dum borobürükiss) ! GЮЯЦ TФ ДЯSTӨTZҚД!
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« Reply #27 on: February 25, 2013, 10:31:04 AM »

The best design is somewhere in between, kazooie and mario, old zelda and new.
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Graham-
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« Reply #28 on: February 25, 2013, 12:15:02 PM »

As an aside:

SMB 3 - hard. forces you to do what you can to pass them.
Super Mario World - expressive, challenges are "straw" challenges, excuses to maneuver
SM64 - combines the two.
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