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999689 Posts in 39241 Topics- by 30651 Members - Latest Member: Deathassassin05

April 24, 2014, 05:33:34 PM
TIGSource ForumsDeveloperCreativeAudioElectro Trap, Dubstep, Moombahton, etc
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Author Topic: Electro Trap, Dubstep, Moombahton, etc  (Read 1026 times)
Gimym JIMBERT
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« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2013, 09:23:55 AM »

Remember street of rage (especially n2) it was totally out of trend and out of genre for the game: so it's possible. It was actually music stolen from discotheque.

https://soundcloud.com/moombahton/rogerthat-by-atrasolis
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ILLOGICAL, random guy on internet, do not trust (lelebĉcülo dum borobürükiss)
C.A. Silbereisen
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« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2013, 09:29:09 AM »

reading what people are mentioning as examples of "dubstep" itt makes me sad. Sad

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S37KRf9umK0

well, it might be a problem of proper terminology, but the so called "brostep" is probably more where popmusic is at at the moment. the original dubstep stuff mostly remains a niche in popmusic.
yeah i know

i never thought i would feel old for liking shit that was made like 6 years ago and not really "getting" the newest trend :/
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petertos
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« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2013, 09:59:21 AM »

Just to point out that there's a small tendence to use chiptunes over dubstep, properly speaking, some dubstep uses chiptune sounds.  Gomez

The other day I heard a word that describes dubstep perfectly: laser. Laser here laser there, looks like we are on Star Wars!  Hand Shake Left
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« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2013, 10:07:18 AM »

you might like moe moe kyunstep then. it's laser chiptunes, although it remains moe.

@sinclair: yeah, the "original" dubstep has a lot more to offer because it's just not so focused on drops and wobble sounds.
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petertos
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« Reply #19 on: February 28, 2013, 10:16:31 AM »

The next trend undoubtly will be in one of these terms: afrodubstep, moombahtrap, trap'a'ton, glitchstep, moombahstep, bongotrap, tribalstep, afrotrap, tribalton, bongoton, and the best one: tripiton, or cryptoton.

I'm already familiar with all those styles. Come to my soundcloud and add me!
http://soundcloud.com/zzzaaappp

LOL
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MoritzPGKatz
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« Reply #20 on: February 28, 2013, 10:35:01 AM »

Hello,

Once a certain style accumulates and gets its own genre name, it's probably already played out - it gets boring, cliché, kitsch, stale. And there are a lot of people trying to jump on the bandwagon, and a lot of the music sounds uninspired, merely good to dance to for the next five years.

I never even got the concept of genres, really. Or at least why people insist on pursuing them when making music.
Just produce what you want to produce and let people call it whatever they like to, or even better let them associate your name with it.

Just my 0.02! Smiley

Cheers,
Moritz
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Gimym JIMBERT
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« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2013, 10:59:50 AM »

you might like moe moe kyunstep then. it's laser chiptunes, although it remains moe.

@sinclair: yeah, the "original" dubstep has a lot more to offer because it's just not so focused on drops and wobble sounds.

Quote
This originally was the result of a rather heated debate with a friend that despite all of its limited audio features... an 8-bit NES can truly make bass-heavy growls without the need of samples.

HOLY SHITting in my pants  Addicted
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seagaia
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« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2013, 11:40:30 AM »

Hello,

Once a certain style accumulates and gets its own genre name, it's probably already played out - it gets boring, cliché, kitsch, stale. And there are a lot of people trying to jump on the bandwagon, and a lot of the music sounds uninspired, merely good to dance to for the next five years.

I never even got the concept of genres, really. Or at least why people insist on pursuing them when making music.
Just produce what you want to produce and let people call it whatever they like to, or even better let them associate your name with it.

Just my 0.02! Smiley

Cheers,
Moritz


My sentiments pretty much - I feel like you will limit your creativity by pursuing a genre actively, rather than just doing what you really enjoy (there is a fine line there but the two are worth distinguishing)...it's always why I kind of laugh when I have to pick genres for my songs on tindeck/sc/bandcamp , like, how the hell am I supposed to do this ?
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« Reply #23 on: February 28, 2013, 11:52:20 AM »

welp if you're a professional electronic dance music producer (think about why it's "producer" and not "composer" for a second) you're catering to a market of DJs who want to play your tracks as part of a set. that's why there are strict formal standards and its also why there are so many subgenres in EDM.
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Lauchsuppe
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« Reply #24 on: February 28, 2013, 12:40:11 PM »

In addition to what sinclair said, genres are also usually made up afterwards and not beforehand (except when you're producing for a certain audience of course). It's just a way of categorizing popmusic. It might not be totally precise, but I feel it helps a lot in talking about music.
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« Reply #25 on: February 28, 2013, 07:43:11 PM »

I'm kind of torn on dubstep.

On one side, a lot of good dubstep songs are fun because of how quirky and offbeat their melodies are, which is hard to find in other electronic music.

On the other side, I often find the actual "drop" of dubstep music to be absolutely terrible.  I don't like the "wub wubs" and jarring noise found in a lot of hard drops.  I've heard some good drops that actually sound amazing because they don't seem to be set on making my ears bleed and use cool/unique sounds rather then the generic "SCREEEEEEEEEEECH WUB WUB WUB" but those seem pretty rare.

I usually end up liking a dubstep song because of a certain part rather then the entire song.

(dubstep tracks I like for one reason or another)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lF_ISeT6On4
END TRACK IS AMAZING

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uhv6yxwJzfE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubyjO4X9gzA
(Mostly just because of the beginning but the whole song is pretty good.)
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petertos
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« Reply #26 on: February 28, 2013, 11:38:17 PM »

I'I'm watching and listening almost any example that is being suggested here, and I'm liking many of them!

When I first listened to a couple of dubstep songs I enjoyed them like so many time ago, almost like when I heard Daft Punk for the first time or Chemical Brothers.

But right now I'm a bit tired of it, almost all songs are the same, an introduction part, a progressive part, and a strong part, and especially the strong part is very similar in most 'dubstep' songs.  Yawn
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« Reply #27 on: March 01, 2013, 03:41:06 AM »

I'I'm watching and listening almost any example that is being suggested here, and I'm liking many of them!

When I first listened to a couple of dubstep songs I enjoyed them like so many time ago, almost like when I heard Daft Punk for the first time or Chemical Brothers.

But right now I'm a bit tired of it, almost all songs are the same, an introduction part, a progressive part, and a strong part, and especially the strong part is very similar in most 'dubstep' songs.  Yawn

Agreed, as much as anticipating the next part of the song can be exciting I've always preferred being surprised by music and not able to predict its layout at the very start (if that makes sense).
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MoritzPGKatz
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« Reply #28 on: March 01, 2013, 07:52:15 AM »

welp if you're a professional electronic dance music producer (think about why it's "producer" and not "composer" for a second) you're catering to a market of DJs who want to play your tracks as part of a set. that's why there are strict formal standards and its also why there are so many subgenres in EDM.
True - if you want to play that game, knowing some standards of the crowd you're producing for can be pretty important.
I just feel that many people are deliberately limiting themselves by following those sets of rules all-too-strictly, and that's when the music ends up being just part of a fad instead of great tunes on their own.
And there are great producers and producer teams out there who manage to do that tightrope walk or even kick off a new trend by combining some of the rules with a fresh brand of sound. Petertos mentioned the Chemical Brothers and Daft Punk, and you could easily add a lot of other names to that: Fatboy Slim, Moby, Gorillaz, The Prodigy, Röyksopp... or less-"mainstream" people like The Knife, Squarepusher or Mr. Oizo, or even whole labels like Warp, Ghostly International or Ninja Tune.

...Of course, it's hard to exclude personal taste when talking about stuff like that, but I feel that the amount of freeloading and uninspired formula-riding is somewhat proportional to the music being a fad or a genre. And not just since Dubstep.

Cheers,
Moritz

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« Reply #29 on: March 01, 2013, 08:55:58 AM »

welp if you're a professional electronic dance music producer (think about why it's "producer" and not "composer" for a second) you're catering to a market of DJs who want to play your tracks as part of a set. that's why there are strict formal standards and its also why there are so many subgenres in EDM.

I don't think EDM producers focus on producing for others as much as for themselves and their own sets. If there are such producers then I don't listen to it probably because it's commercialized, crappy and generic. The reason why there are so many sub-genres right now is because of the new bedroom producer phenomenon, Soundcloud etc.
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