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1066880 Posts in 43550 Topics- by 35594 Members - Latest Member: read_forerunner

November 26, 2014, 02:46:40 PM
TIGSource ForumsDeveloperTechnical (Moderators: Glaiel-Gamer, ThemsAllTook)Programming Language to start with
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Author Topic: Programming Language to start with  (Read 2331 times)
rivon
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« Reply #20 on: March 01, 2013, 08:07:46 AM »

And when you learn the Python basics, you can take a look at Pygame which is a library which you can use to easily make games.
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ஒழுக்கின்மை
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« Reply #21 on: March 01, 2013, 09:05:09 AM »

nah your right my dog is almost identically to a giraffe too and  Panda ==  Tiger
...if you know one computer language, you can learn another in a few weeks...

I am glad to see you became a much better programmer though in the last two weeks.

..learning an entirely new engine and IDE takes months to years...

the only real similarities in those two examples is the string "Hello, World!"
and because you know and have been working with (different) programming languages for a long time you see many (conceptual) similarities.
But the OP is a beginner (hasn't touched a programming language)

but whatever.
to the OP

try Python Wink

you seem to be writing a lot here but i'm not sure what you are saying -- so i'm not sure how to reply -- except to repeat that, because learning a second or a third computer language is so easy once you know at least one, it doesn't really matter what you start with, since the basics of all programming languages are identical, and that it's pretty much fine whatever you learn first since the knowledge you gain from your first language will transfer over to any other language (unlike with spoken languages)

you seem to be getting hung up over specific meanings of words, but the nature of equivalency, difference, similarity, and identity aren't really all that important here, they're more philosophical or epistemological concerns. what matters is: if he learns any language, he can pick up any other language very quickly, and, knowing that, it doesn't matter which language he starts with
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nikki
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« Reply #22 on: March 01, 2013, 09:50:42 AM »

Yes Paul, I agree on your general gist here, the thing is the poster wonders what programming language to start with.
In essence many programming languages share similar constructions that's right.
I also agree that to become a better programmer one needs to learn a few different languages. I offcourse also agree that after a few languages you realy start seeing the bigger picture.

But at this point the poster is asking where to start and for that some options are better then others.
A first language would be better if it is:
small, clean, designed instead of grown,  not too obtuse, not too dumb, lets you work quickly and is capable of giving you proper english-like debugging feedback.

All of these things so you actually learn the essences more quickly instead of shooting ones foot for weeks.

and you seem to want to make spoken languages very different to programming languages but if you want to get all Epistemological phylosophical on my ass, think about this :
Quote
don't all spoken language learners just start with that very simple and small language called baby sounds ?

it's like Python in sound
without the smelly diapers..


oh and
@ ♪ Redix ♪
Have you got it working ? the hour has passed  Wink

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♪ Redix ♪
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« Reply #23 on: March 01, 2013, 10:19:09 AM »



oh and
@ ♪ Redix ♪
Have you got it working ? the hour has passed  Wink



Hehehe  Smiley, i wanted currently to read this: http://inventwithpython.com/makinggames.pdf is very complete but i decided to start with the link you given to me ( http://learnpythonthehardway.org/book/ ) and then read the book from pygame.
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rivon
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« Reply #24 on: March 01, 2013, 02:36:53 PM »

Yeah, Learn The *Language* The Hard Way are very good and easy tutorials. Definitely start with it Wink
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Muz
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« Reply #25 on: March 01, 2013, 08:58:28 PM »

Did you try Udacity? It's interactive (i.e. it checks your code), introduces CS basics, and by the end of it, you'll know how to make a web crawler. And it's taught by an actual university professor guy who has a PhD from MIT and has written a book on the subject.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2013, 09:03:34 PM by Muz » Logged
Ryland
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« Reply #26 on: March 01, 2013, 10:21:57 PM »

If he learns any language, he can pick up any other language very quickly, and, knowing that, it doesn't matter which language he starts with
I agree with Paul Eres on this point when we're talking about the more popular languages which are typically OOP. But try to learn a purely functional language like Haskell, and it's like trying to learn your first language all over again! (It's fun, though.) But yeah, as far as the python and c hello world examples nikki gave, they're pretty much the same conceptually.
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Gimym JIMBERT
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« Reply #27 on: March 02, 2013, 01:58:40 AM »

Technically assembly is easiest because it does exactly what you write, no interpretation, however the stuff you can do is pretty barebone and are far from human "interest".

But another consideration to start is the need to compile. With basic (old computer), you write the code then press run and see result immediately, with c like you must compile then find the exe, which mean learning to compile.
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« Reply #28 on: March 02, 2013, 02:19:04 AM »

Compiling is trivial nowadays. And I don't get why people are even mentioning purely functional languages in this thread. It's simply about what programming language to start with. It's enough of a hurdle without people confusing you with esoterics and unnecessary details.

So yeah. Python with a good text editor (like Sublime Text) and running .py files from the command line is the way to go. An IDE is not needed.
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♪ Redix ♪
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« Reply #29 on: March 02, 2013, 08:12:59 AM »

Did you try Udacity? It's interactive (i.e. it checks your code), introduces CS basics, and by the end of it, you'll know how to make a web crawler. And it's taught by an actual university professor guy who has a PhD from MIT and has written a book on the subject.
I don't need that for the moment, but thank you. I decided to stick arround on Python a while.


Compiling is trivial nowadays. And I don't get why people are even mentioning purely functional languages in this thread. It's simply about what programming language to start with. It's enough of a hurdle without people confusing you with esoterics and unnecessary details.

So yeah. Python with a good text editor (like Sublime Text) and running .py files from the command line is the way to go. An IDE is not needed.

Woah, Sublime Text look's awesome, thank you for that! But i need some help to configure the Sublime Text 2 for Python and PyGame, thank you in advance.

L.E. I solved it.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2013, 08:23:12 AM by ♪ Redix ♪ » Logged

Polly
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« Reply #30 on: March 02, 2013, 10:52:44 AM »

But another consideration to start is the need to compile. With basic (old computer), you write the code then press run and see result immediately, with c like you must compile then find the exe, which mean learning to compile.

Especially when you're just starting out and are likely to make many mistakes, the time spend waiting for those mistakes to appear can add up significantly when you need to compile / build / run your project every time you make a change. You can't beat instant feedback ..



Unfortunately most mainstream / popular solutions don't have a very short feedback cycle.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2013, 01:15:02 PM by Polly » Logged
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« Reply #31 on: March 02, 2013, 09:00:21 PM »

You can't beat instant feedback ..

You can try out OpenGL thingies with Ken Silverman's EvalDraw.

It's quite instant!
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« Reply #32 on: March 02, 2013, 10:48:51 PM »

Please, don't do like me and overlook logic, algorithms, linear algebra, simple physics... I tried and tried to learn how to program for a few months, and just don't seems to really works. It's easy to learn the syntax of a language, but for understand and "create" with the code you need to have the basic knowledge.

This is the opinion of a person in the same situation that have made more progress in the last 4 days than in the last months.

..or I am talking nonsense and need to getting trying haha

Sorry for the bad english, working on it Smiley
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Paind33r
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« Reply #33 on: March 02, 2013, 10:55:32 PM »

Python and Game Maker are both great to start with, but I wouldn't suggest construct if they tied me to a chair and lit it on fire. My Word!
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