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1026983 Posts in 41182 Topics- by 32790 Members - Latest Member: Sir Bro

July 26, 2014, 09:12:32 AM
TIGSource ForumsDeveloperBusinessIs it wrong not wanting to make money from games dev?
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Author Topic: Is it wrong not wanting to make money from games dev?  (Read 2862 times)
Klaim
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« Reply #30 on: April 18, 2013, 02:04:09 PM »

I wouldn't say "money is the score board of life", but I would say "Money DELTA is a pretty good life game score mechanics".

I don't agree because these last years I have lowered progressively money income but got time on what I think is most valuable in my life instead of spending that time working for money. I am far more happier that way.

Quality time is a far better metric. And obviously, money can help buy it. I guess having both is the top challenge.
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Sealunar
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« Reply #31 on: April 20, 2013, 01:18:06 PM »

Chances are if you are making something truly good and entertaining, you will have the opportunity to make money from it.
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PompiPompi
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« Reply #32 on: April 21, 2013, 08:24:02 AM »

Klaim, I said it's like a game mechanic, not that it will make you happy.
It was fun earning a few hundred of bucks from my early games, even though I already earned more than that with a salary. It's the challenge of earning money from stuff you create.
If I would create something stupid and some insane guy will give me a million dollars for it, it won't feel the same.
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Klaim
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« Reply #33 on: April 21, 2013, 03:25:10 PM »

Klaim, I said it's like a game mechanic, not that it will make you happy.

Quote from: PompiPompi
I would say "Money DELTA is a pretty good life game score mechanics".

If it's a good life game score mechanics, then you imply that it's a good way to measure your progress in life, which, to me, mean progress toward being happy (I'm not talking about hollywood/american-dream bullshit here).

Maybe you didn't say "good" in the meaning of "good for life" but "efficient" for something I don't see mentioned here?

Anyway I I don't agree either on the mechanic side. Money value is too blurry. It don't represent something specific. That's why income sources have to be mentionned in data to understand it's meaning.

[/offtopic?]
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cynicalsandel
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« Reply #34 on: April 21, 2013, 04:37:24 PM »

If I won the lottery, I'd most likely only make free games. The only reason I'd consider charging for one would be because some see "free" as a sign of lower quality.

However, I haven't won the lottery and I most likely never will. I also will probably never acquire a large sum of money that removes the need to support myself monetarily. Currently, I have a full-time job unrelated to video games, which saps the creativity and energy right out of me. It leaves me with very little left to try to create even free games. I feel as though if I wanted to make games for a living, I'd need to charge money in order to attempt to support myself.

So, no I don't think there is anything wrong with not wanting to make money. I can only speak for myself, but I'd only want to profit off of games so I could continue working on them without having to have a separate job to support myself like I do currently.
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Oskuro
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« Reply #35 on: April 22, 2013, 02:59:35 AM »

The only reason I'd consider charging for one would be because some see "free" as a sign of lower quality.

That is, sadly, very true. There's a very strong social conditioning towards associating price with quality and viceversa, resulting in good but cheap products being ignored in favor of overpriced ones.

Not sure how this can be overcome, apart from continuing to push out nice free/inexpensive games and hope the audience realizes a price point is not necessarily indicative of quality.


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ஒழுக்கின்மை
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RinkuHero
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« Reply #36 on: April 22, 2013, 03:02:36 AM »

if someone wants a game for free they pirate it anyway, it's not like charging for a game rather than making it free prevents most people from playing it if they want to play it, so i don't think people should worry about it all that much
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kinglake
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« Reply #37 on: April 22, 2013, 04:28:54 AM »

Nope, it's not wrong to want to make games for free. I'm sure there are people who draw, write, play an instrument, etc who don't want to make money from it and only want to do it for free :-)
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crstngz
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« Reply #38 on: April 23, 2013, 01:01:27 PM »

I always thought that it would be cool to pay for a game after playing it.

For example, Dwarf Fortress became one of my favorite games and it's a free game. After playing it for hours and hours I wanted to give money to Toady(the dev), because I genuinely thought he deserved it.
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Cloudiest Nights
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« Reply #39 on: April 23, 2013, 07:53:46 PM »

I don't really know where I fit in with freeware vs commercial. I've been "programming" for years in GameMaker using D&D, and I've made a few weekend projects, but now I'm working on my first full game that I'm planning to sell to pay for (at least part of) college costs. I kinda feel like I shouldn't be selling this game, since I'm no Notch, Jonathan Blow, or Phil Fish (lol). I'm not an amazing programmer, artist, or musician. I'm not even outta high school yet! Is this feeling normal(ish)?
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ANtY
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« Reply #40 on: April 24, 2013, 03:28:17 AM »

I always thought that it would be cool to pay for a game after playing it.
demo version?
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mychii
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« Reply #41 on: May 15, 2013, 10:47:19 PM »

The question is, do you make a living from game development? if not, and you're just being a hobbyist, then not wanting to make money from game dev is just for you.
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seagaia
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« Reply #42 on: May 15, 2013, 11:10:56 PM »

I don't really know where I fit in with freeware vs commercial. I've been "programming" for years in GameMaker using D&D, and I've made a few weekend projects, but now I'm working on my first full game that I'm planning to sell to pay for (at least part of) college costs. I kinda feel like I shouldn't be selling this game, since I'm no Notch, Jonathan Blow, or Phil Fish (lol). I'm not an amazing programmer, artist, or musician. I'm not even outta high school yet! Is this feeling normal(ish)?

Don't compare yourself to indies that have made it big. Skillsets vary wildly, I'd wager that their games are just as good as many other games that don't make money - they're just entrenched in the community (blow), extremely lucky (notch) or amazing marketers (fish) who additionally happen to make marketable games.

if you want to go commercial, go for it. only you can decide.

just know that by going commercial and wanting to make a living, there's a whole world of work you need to deal with: press releases, timing, marketing, building a fanbase throughout development. (you can't just release a game and expect it to sell, 99/100 times it won't).

well, you finished games so that's really good. now maybe try joining some communities and try to meet artists - you can probably get by with contracting out music (as much as I like music and write it for my own games, it's mostly an afterthought for most, most musicians aren't even considered co-creators of the game)

look at other indies who went commerical, see what they did for marketing. find what works for you, take risks, it's money so things are inherently risky...good luck!
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ஒழுக்கின்மை
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RinkuHero
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« Reply #43 on: May 16, 2013, 01:01:02 AM »

I don't really know where I fit in with freeware vs commercial. I've been "programming" for years in GameMaker using D&D, and I've made a few weekend projects, but now I'm working on my first full game that I'm planning to sell to pay for (at least part of) college costs. I kinda feel like I shouldn't be selling this game, since I'm no Notch, Jonathan Blow, or Phil Fish (lol). I'm not an amazing programmer, artist, or musician. I'm not even outta high school yet! Is this feeling normal(ish)?

that's kinda like saying 'i don't want to lift weights, i'm no arnold schwarzenegger'

there are about 10,000 commercial indie game developers; most of them are not as famous as the ones you named. you only hear about the millionaires and wild success stories, rather than the every day people doing it, so you shouldn't compare yourself to the few you have heard about
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Darren_D_Daley
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« Reply #44 on: May 16, 2013, 01:30:10 AM »

I don't really know where I fit in with freeware vs commercial. I've been "programming" for years in GameMaker using D&D, and I've made a few weekend projects, but now I'm working on my first full game that I'm planning to sell to pay for (at least part of) college costs. I kinda feel like I shouldn't be selling this game, since I'm no Notch, Jonathan Blow, or Phil Fish (lol). I'm not an amazing programmer, artist, or musician. I'm not even outta high school yet! Is this feeling normal(ish)?

that's kinda like saying 'i don't want to lift weights, i'm no arnold schwarzenegger'

there are about 10,000 commercial indie game developers; most of them are not as famous as the ones you named. you only hear about the millionaires and wild success stories, rather than the every day people doing it, so you shouldn't compare yourself to the few you have heard about

Plus on top of that most of these guys have at least a decade of experience. So don't be so hard on yourself
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