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998267 Posts in 39150 Topics- by 30560 Members - Latest Member: kust

April 18, 2014, 01:23:13 PM
TIGSource ForumsDeveloperCreativeArtWorkshopHow do you improve your lineart?
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Author Topic: How do you improve your lineart?  (Read 709 times)
Cellusious
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« on: May 08, 2013, 02:46:55 AM »








And a 1000x1000 image.

My line art is.. meh, it's shakey and so forth. Any ideas/help on how to improve?
Linked a few images over so it's easier to pull out the good and the bad's i do.

(I'm on a wacom intuos5 m touch. Photoshop cs5)
(>5 months with non pixel art, doing a "concept art/digital art" piece every two week or so)
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bitserum
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« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2013, 07:14:33 AM »

I'm not a good artist, but when I need some clean lines from sketches (usually for icons, logos and such), it boils down to erasing the excess lines/shades and often turning everything into vectors. Vectors are more easily/precisely manipulated with Bézier curves, than pixels are.
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Catguy
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« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2013, 07:29:47 AM »

I've been (hell, am) exactly where you are, and honestly, the answer is:

-Draw more lines. 'Clean' lineart is the culmination of a lot of really difficult skills. Contour drawing, line weight, perspective, gesture drawing, analyzing form... You just need to draw a hell of a lot more, and let yourself struggle with trying to get it right for a while. Find more artists whose lines you admire, and try to find out what makes them tick. It's not that they hold a pen steadier than you, it's that they make better decisions.

-You have a very 'messy', tactile style, where I assume you like to feel around a lot with lines as you draw. Don't fight that and try to make super clean pen lines -- embrace it. Even with that style, clean lineart is simply a matter of skill.

-Lastly, don't be afraid to cheat just a bit. Fake it until you make it is a great motto -- if you need to use the photoshop pen tool every once in a while to get some intricate, clean forms in perspective, do it, it's going to be more productive to put out a lot of good drawings than it is to agonize over one beizer curve.

ps: dont forget to make your canvas big enough to effectively support whatever brushes you're using. In photoshop some artists like to go by 2x monitor res, and I honestly like to go even bigger, because shit starts to feel weird and fiddly when a brush gets small.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2013, 07:35:02 AM by Catguy » Logged


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Cellusious
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« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2013, 08:02:07 AM »

I'm not a good artist, but when I need some clean lines from sketches (usually for icons, logos and such), it boils down to erasing the excess lines/shades and often turning everything into vectors. Vectors are more easily/precisely manipulated with Bézier curves, than pixels are.

I've been (hell, am) exactly where you are, and honestly, the answer is:

-Draw more lines. 'Clean' lineart is the culmination of a lot of really difficult skills. Contour drawing, line weight, perspective, gesture drawing, analyzing form... You just need to draw a hell of a lot more, and let yourself struggle with trying to get it right for a while. Find more artists whose lines you admire, and try to find out what makes them tick. It's not that they hold a pen steadier than you, it's that they make better decisions.

-You have a very 'messy', tactile style, where I assume you like to feel around a lot with lines as you draw. Don't fight that and try to make super clean pen lines -- embrace it. Even with that style, clean lineart is simply a matter of skill.

-Lastly, don't be afraid to cheat just a bit. Fake it until you make it is a great motto -- if you need to use the photoshop pen tool every once in a while to get some intricate, clean forms in perspective, do it, it's going to be more productive to put out a lot of good drawings than it is to agonize over one beizer curve.

ps: dont forget to make your canvas big enough to effectively support whatever brushes you're using. In photoshop some artists like to go by 2x monitor res, and I honestly like to go even bigger, because shit starts to feel weird and fiddly when a brush gets small.

Thanks!
Advice taken to heart, i'll look over this and keep it in mind whenever i do this. Smiley
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