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TIGSource ForumsDeveloperTechnical (Moderator: ThemsAllTook)Programming Language Resources
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st33d
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« Reply #80 on: May 17, 2012, 02:26:50 am »

Merged.
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retrohelix
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« Reply #81 on: June 01, 2012, 02:24:52 am »

I'm reading learn python the hard way at the moment, it's rather good.

I'm not sure if this has been posted, but http://programming-motherfucker.com/become.html has a wealth of information for most languages.
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« Reply #82 on: June 29, 2012, 10:23:39 am »

I'm pretty new to programming, and I have dabble a tad in Actionscript 2, and a minute amount of C++. I'm really getting more interested in programming (possibly for a career later in life, but maybe not). I have, for the past few years (I'm 16 now) really wanted to create my own game. I started in Macromedia flash, with Actionscript 2 learning how to make a character jump and walk and how to make buttons/enemies etc. This year I rose up to C++, learning a very small amount of things like variables, arrays, strings basic syntax adding strings etc (i used codeblocks). Anyways, I realized it probably wasnt the smartest idea to try and completely learn C++ when all I wanted to do was make a game. Right? I've been thinking about maybe going towards c#, java or javascript so I can actually create a fully functioning game (totally willing to put in the time and effort). Java may be a smarter choice because my Mom knows some basic java  (she took a java course) and my friends dad, who has been interested in my programming and always will to help me is a java programmer. Java is also taught in AP computer sciences at school and its a class I really want to take in the next year or two (the class requires no previous programming knowledge btw) .

Anyways, I've been reading through these threads and was wondering which language will be most useful/fit my needs the best? I'm looking to create a game with the programming complexity (if that makes sense) of games like Owlboy, fez, froggato etc. The game I'm currently planning on making is a 2d pixel game, and I might want to go into some 3d when  I become a lot more experienced but who knows (so I want a language that can be programmed with 3d software too) . I would also like a language that has alot of tutorials/books out there and is more common. thanks a ton Grin
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« Reply #83 on: June 29, 2012, 10:36:21 am »

Quote
I would also like a language that has alot of tutorials/books out there and is more common

I believe that only C++, Java and eventually C# has those. Looking at your needs and what people surround you, just go with Java. It's powerful, has many tutorials/books, can do 3D and it works for android + browser if you ever need it. Seems a reasonable choice in your position!
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« Reply #84 on: June 29, 2012, 11:21:16 am »

Quote
I would also like a language that has alot of tutorials/books out there and is more common

I believe that only C++, Java and eventually C# has those. Looking at your needs and what people surround you, just go with Java. It's powerful, has many tutorials/books, can do 3D and it works for android + browser if you ever need it. Seems a reasonable choice in your position!

thanks. I think I'm gonna go with C# (my friends dad also knows it), it seems much more widely used with game programming--any suggestions on a good game engine/compiler, I'm not sure the difference  Undecided, or which counts as what Concerned. I like the idea of having a stage (flash macromedia as appose to codeBlocks) and being able to place/import images to the stage. Its all good if I can attain that without doing something like actionscript, but I just need a new program where I can start programming in.   Smiley
« Last Edit: June 29, 2012, 12:29:32 pm by beestings » Logged
Maud'Dib Atreides
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« Reply #85 on: August 10, 2012, 07:06:31 pm »

Quote
I would also like a language that has alot of tutorials/books out there and is more common

I believe that only C++, Java and eventually C# has those. Looking at your needs and what people surround you, just go with Java. It's powerful, has many tutorials/books, can do 3D and it works for android + browser if you ever need it. Seems a reasonable choice in your position!

thanks. I think I'm gonna go with C# (my friends dad also knows it), it seems much more widely used with game programming--any suggestions on a good game engine/compiler, I'm not sure the difference  Undecided, or which counts as what Concerned. I like the idea of having a stage (flash macromedia as appose to codeBlocks) and being able to place/import images to the stage. Its all good if I can attain that without doing something like actionscript, but I just need a new program where I can start programming in.   Smiley

SGDK2

http://sgdk2.sf.net

It's used to create 2D games in C#. (Potentially create 3D games, but I'm the only person who's modded the engine that far for my own project Wink  but that's another story for another day)

It's how I learned C#. It teaches you how to grasp the syntax of the language, and the basic logic, through dropdown box selectable logic, eventually giving you enough skill to take on the library's out of the box code to create your own game through C# code. It features an in-program code editor and can be used to import external C# libraries, such as Box2D, Lidgren, even the OpenTK wrapper for OpenGL.

Open Source, editable in Visual Studio- even compiles without it.

Try it if you don't feel confident with XNA or Unity. Any questions, message me and join the SGDK2 forums or I can give you information about the moderator- he also is a user on this site.

Trust me, you'll love it. It's a rewarding program.
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« Reply #86 on: August 14, 2012, 10:45:05 am »

Trust me, you'll love it. It's a rewarding program.

You forgot to mention the in-editor tile map editing, complete with different layers. Or the in-editor sprite editing and very capable pixel art creation features.

I've played around with the SGDK2 as well, and found it to be quite capable. I personally prefer it to programs like Game Maker.
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« Reply #87 on: August 14, 2012, 12:02:52 pm »

I tried it but I found it confusing and a bit cluncky to use, but I have no idea of how powerful it is really
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« Reply #88 on: August 14, 2012, 04:46:32 pm »

Trust me, you'll love it. It's a rewarding program.

You forgot to mention the in-editor tile map editing, complete with different layers. Or the in-editor sprite editing and very capable pixel art creation features.

I've played around with the SGDK2 as well, and found it to be quite capable. I personally prefer it to programs like Game Maker.

Yeah, while browsing the forums before asking a question already asked, I've seen your name there quite a few times. It's nice that I can meet other SGDK2 users (past?) here. I've seen another one, and he seemed to have found the creator of the engine here (who I informed about this site myself)

but I digress

SGDK2 is powerful. I've been able to achieve 3D with it now myself. Small milestone, I know. But I feel great just for achieving it. Again, you guys should try it.


Quote
I tried it but I found it confusing and a bit cluncky to use, but I have no idea of how powerful it is really

Really? Well there's not much of a learning curve as compared to most game development IDE's, but I guess everyone is different. (I tried Game Maker once, when I was 13. Promptly uninstalled 3 hours later, it was slow on my computer and slightly confusing to me, especially since I had already dedicated myself to SGDK- then there was the nagboxes for registration of Game Maker)

I'd be more than happy to show you and everyone else how useful it is. I'll release a devlog of a game I've been working on for 3 years (on and off) soon, which I'm making in combination SGDK2 and Visual Studio. Hopefully it will bring more and more users toward the engine.
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moi
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« Reply #89 on: August 15, 2012, 05:37:50 am »

it appears I was thinking about another program, something with "scrolling" in the name too
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« Reply #90 on: September 20, 2012, 08:22:08 pm »

I figure that since I'm using Common Lisp for my own game, and this thread doesn't mention any members of the Lisp family, I should help out.


Books

Beginner
Practical Common Lisp

More Advanced
On Lisp
Let Over Lambda
SICP (technically uses Scheme)

Common Lisp Wiki
Quicklisp
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baconman
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« Reply #91 on: October 30, 2012, 05:44:17 am »

I may have hit the GML motherload!! Shocked
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« Reply #92 on: December 24, 2012, 03:19:35 am »


Oooohh, I kept trying to find this site the longest time ago! I lost the link to it and it faded into the back of my mind. Almost like a iv hit the treasure trove again.
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« Reply #93 on: February 24, 2013, 12:16:10 am »

So is a post summarising most of the papers introducing recent pathfinding algorithms useful? Links to paper in original:

How do the state-of-the-art pathfinding algorithms for changing graphs (D*, D*-Lite, LPA*, etc) differ?
Quote
So, I skimmed through the papers, and this is what I gleamed. If there is anyone more knowledgable in the subject-matter, please correct me if I'm wrong (or add your own answer, and I will accept it instead!).

Links to each paper can be found in the question-post, above.

    Simple recalculations

  • D* (aka Dynamic A*) (1994): On the initial run, D* runs very similarly to A*, finding the best path from start to finish very quickly. However, as the unit moves from start to finish, if the graph changes, D* is able to very quickly recalculate the best path from that unit's position to the finish, much faster than simply running A* from that unit's position again. D*, however, has a reputation for being extremely complex, and has been completely obsoleted by the much simpler D*-Lite.
  • Focused D* (1995): An improvement to D* to make it faster/"more realtime." I can't find any comparisons to D*-Lite, but given that this is older and D*-Lite is talked about a lot more, I assume that D*-Lite is somehow better.
  • DynamicSWSF-FP (1996): Stores the distance from every node to the finish-node. Has a large initial setup to calculate all the distances. After changes to the graph, it's able to update only the nodes whose distances have changed. Unrelated to both A* and D*. Useful when you want to find the distance from multiple nodes to the finish after each change; otherwise, LPA* or D*-Lite are typically more useful.
  • LPA*/Incremental A* (2001): LPA* (Lifelong Planning A*), also known as Incremental A* (and sometimes, confusingly, as "LPA," though it has no relation to the other algorithm named LPA) is a combination of DynamicSWSF-FP and A*. On the first run, it is exactly the same as A*. After minor changes to the graph, however, subsequent searches from the same start/finish pair are able to use the information from previous runs to drastically reduce the number of nodes which need to be examined, compared to A*. This is exactly my problem, so it sounds like LPA* will be my best fit. LPA* differs from D* in that it always finds the best path from the same start to the same finish; it is not used when the start point is moving (such as units moving along the initial best path). However...
  • D*-Lite (2002): This algorithm uses LPA* to mimic D*; that is, it uses LPA* to find the new best path for a unit as it moves along the initial best path and the graph changes. D*-Lite is considered much simpler than D*, and since it always runs at least as fast as D*, it has completely obsoleted D*. Thus, there is never any reason to use D*; use D*-Lite instead.
Any-angle movement
  • Field D* (2007): A variant of D*-Lite which does not constrain movement to a grid; that is, the best path can have the unit moving along any angle, not just 45- (or 90-)degrees between grid-points. Was used by NASA to pathfind for the Mars rovers.
  • Theta* (2007): A variant of A* that gives better (shorter) paths than Field D*. However, because it is based on A* rather than D*-Lite, it does not have the fast-replanning capabilities that Field D* does. See also.
  • Incremental Phi* (2009): The best of both worlds. A version of Theta* that is incremental (aka allows fast-replanning)
Moving Target Points
  • GAA* (2008): GAA* (Generalized Adaptive A*) is a variant of A* that handles moving target points. It's a generalization of an even earlier algorithm called "Moving Target Adaptive A*"
  • GRFA* (2010): GFRA* (Generalized Fringe-Retrieving A*) appears (?) to be a generalization of GAA* to arbitrary graphs (ie. not restricted to 2D) using techniques from another algorithm called FRA*.
  • MTD*-Lite (2010): MTD*-Lite (Moving Target D*-Lite) is "an extension of D* Lite that uses the principle behind Generalized Fringe-Retrieving A*" to do fast-replanning moving-target searches.
  • Tree-AA* (2011): (Huh?) Appears to be an algorithm for searching unknown terrain, but is based on Adaptive A*, like all other algorithms in this section, so I put it here. Not sure how it compares to the others in this section.
Fast/Sub-optimal
  • Anytime D* (2005): This is an "Anytime" variant of D*-Lite, done by combining D*-Lite with an algorithm called Anytime Repairing A*. An "Anytime" algorithm is one which can run under any time constraints - it will find a very suboptimal path very quickly to begin with, then improve upon that path the more time it is given.
  • HPA* (2004): HPA* (Hierarchical Path-Finding A*) is for path-finding a large number of units on a large graph, such as in RTS (real-time strategy) video games. They will all have different starting locations, and potentially different ending locations. HPA* breaks the graph into a hierarchy in order to quickly find "near-optimal" paths for all these units much more quickly than running A* on each of them individually. See also
  • PRA* (2005): From what I understand, PRA* (Partial Refinement A*) solves the same problem as HPA*, but in a different way. They both have "similar performance characteristics."
    HAA* (2008): HAA* (Hierarchical Annotated A*) is a generalization of HPA* that allows for restricted traversal of some units over some terrains (ex. a small pathway that some units can walk through but larger ones can't; or a hole that only flying units can cross; etc.)
Other/Unknown
  • LPA (1997): LPA (Loop-free path-finding algorithm) appears to be a routing-algorithm only marginally related to the problems the other algorithms here solve. I only mention it because this paper is confusingly (and incorrectly) referenced on several places on the Internet as the paper introducing LPA*, which it is not.
  • LEARCH (2009): LEARCH is a combination of machine-learning algorithms, used to teach robots how to find near-optimal paths on their own. The authors suggest combining LEARCH with Field D* for better results.
  • BDDD* (2009): Huh? I cannot access the paper.
    SetA* (2002): Huh? This is, apparently, a variant of A* that searches over the "binary decision diagram" (BDD) model of the graph? They claim that it runs "several orders of magnitude faster than A*" in some cases. However, if I'm understanding correctly, those cases are when each node on the graph has many edges?

Again, links to papers in original post.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2013, 12:21:21 am by JobLeonard » Logged
skaldicpoet9
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« Reply #94 on: February 24, 2013, 12:49:34 am »

Just updated OP with links to various Python and Pygame related tutorials.

So is a post summarising most of the papers introducing recent pathfinding algorithms useful?

I don't see why not. It could prove to be useful. I'll add it to the additional resources section. Thanks for the link Wink
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« Reply #95 on: June 03, 2013, 10:55:44 am »

So far the best C++ reference I was able to find:
http://en.cppreference.com/w/

Too bad they don't always properly differentiate between C and C++.
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« Reply #96 on: July 30, 2013, 01:02:56 am »

Would video links be any kind of useful?
I find Channel 9 a great resource:
C#: http://channel9.msdn.com/Series/C-Sharp-Fundamentals-Development-for-Absolute-Beginners/

VB.Net: http://channel9.msdn.com/Series/Visual-Basic-Development-for-Absolute-Beginners
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« Reply #97 on: December 13, 2013, 11:08:25 pm »

Please add this exhaustive tutorial on using OpenGL with Python (PyOpenGL): http://www.math.uiuc.edu/~gfrancis/illimath/StanBlank/PyOpenGL.pdf

This is THE ONLY in depth tutorial for PyOpenGL that I have ever found, and it is quite lengthy. It's the course manual from a class taught on the subject at mid-low level Python experience required.
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« Reply #98 on: January 25, 2014, 03:39:43 pm »

This is awesome for learning the F# language, BTW.
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« Reply #99 on: January 27, 2014, 07:12:57 pm »

Fuck this list and its resources... Ninja
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