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TIGSource ForumsDeveloperPlaytestingMFA Prep Course
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mkapolka
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« on: July 17, 2011, 04:55:27 pm »

MFA Prep Course is about the life of an art school undergrad. In it you drink coffee and smoke cigarettes.

Use the mouse to control the right hand, WASD + space to control the left.



Play it here (Flash)

I'm curious to know what you all think of it. I think there's a lot of potential in non-goal-oriented games (non-games?) that hasn't really been explored yet, and I don't see these types of works very often. Is MFA Prep Course playable? Enjoyable? Interesting? Is this style of play worth pursuing?
« Last Edit: July 17, 2011, 05:05:48 pm by mkapolka » Logged
starsrift
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« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2011, 06:00:02 pm »

I'm curious to know what you all think of it. I think there's a lot of potential in non-goal-oriented games (non-games?) that hasn't really been explored yet, and I don't see these types of works very often.
Is MFA Prep Course playable? Enjoyable? Interesting? Is this style of play worth pursuing?

Yes, it's playable. Enjoyable and interesting? Hmmmm. I think of it like an exploration game, except instead of seeing an environment, you're seeing functionality (what things can you do with the environment). It's interesting to me until I see everything. In that vein, I would say the style of gameplay is worth pursuing as much as exploration games are. Smiley
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« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2011, 06:47:14 am »

I feel it would be harder to play both hand (Mouse for the first one, keyboard for the second) but at least it wasn't so bad! I think it would be painful for a casual player to master the control of both hands, but anyway it is still playable with only one hand!

I feel it very enjoyable, mostly because I was looking for new kind of crazy interaction between objects such as use the lighter on the curtains, smoke several cigarets in the mouth, put my cellphone in the coffee maker, etc... However, when I realize it wasn't allowed by the game I came here to put some ideas.

Even if you don't need to allow player to set the room on fire, it could be nice to see some tiny detail which will show an evolution of the players actions. Here some ideas:

- A visual and limited number of cigarets in the pack.
- The possibility to take a look at the windows to see outside and observe random events.
- Each cigaret filter you throw might stayed around on the desk.
- A button turn ON/OFF button on the coffee machine, etc.

And by the way, if you already don't know this, here is food for thought: Not game manifesto
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sabajt
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« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2011, 09:28:54 am »

I've always been interested in games or not-games that allows us to have "fine" control over very specific things, like this or a more extreme example: Bennett Foddy's "QWOP".  Like those above, I do feel this is a project worth developing, but there's just not much to it right now.  The addition of details that the player can discover would be great as it would motivate mastering the controls.  What if you expanded the project to be a series of mini-games, (or mini-not-games) that were interconnected?  Maybe, there could be a portion were you had to write, which I'm sure could inspire another spectacularly awkward control scheme. 

Anyway, though I'm not an MFA student, I work a boring office job, so it's time to get some  Coffee and maybe have a  Cool as well  Wink
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mkapolka
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« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2011, 06:09:55 pm »

Thanks for the feedback everyone! I don't think I'm going to be developing this particular game any further, but I am definitely taking the lessons I'm learning to my upcoming projects.

I think of it like an exploration game, except instead of seeing an environment, you're seeing functionality (what things can you do with the environment). It's interesting to me until I see everything. In that vein, I would say the style of gameplay is worth pursuing as much as exploration games are. Smiley

This is really good to know. I was hoping more people would play it as a kind of relaxation game, but this type of play is looking way more common, and the two are definitely not at odds. One of the skills I want to get better at is making systems that interact with each other and build in complexity, a la blocks in Minecraft or the different objects in Super Mario World.

I feel it very enjoyable, mostly because I was looking for new kind of crazy interaction between objects such as use the lighter on the curtains, smoke several cigarets in the mouth, put my cellphone in the coffee maker, etc... However, when I realize it wasn't allowed by the game I came here to put some ideas.
...
And by the way, if you already don't know this, here is food for thought: Not game manifesto

Sorry to disappoint! I guess with a game like this it can be hard to tell which actions are going to get a response and which aren't.
I am very familiar with the notgames movement Smiley although I don't tend to think of myself as being in their camp necessarily. I actually posted this on their forums, but the response hasn't been nearly as exciting Tongue

I've always been interested in games or not-games that allows us to have "fine" control over very specific things, like this or a more extreme example: Bennett Foddy's "QWOP"...

QWOP was definitely an inspiration, although I'm not huge on "mastery": there's a little bit of it in this game (smoking three cigarettes at once takes a bit of dexterity), but I like to keep the bulk of the interesting interactions at a low skill level, if I can (that's my goal anyway).
"Interconnected mini-games" is a good idea- even if they were on the same screen the systems could be complete within their own frame, but connect via key interactions.
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jotapeh
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« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2011, 11:20:33 am »

Heh, this reminds me of like a really advanced version of the old HyperCard tutorial with the food pellets/fishbowl. It's a fun lil distraction and I think it could honestly be worth fleshing out a touch more.
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MattG
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« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2011, 12:49:57 pm »

Heh, this reminds me of like a really advanced version of the old HyperCard tutorial with the food pellets/fishbowl. It's a fun lil distraction and I think it could honestly be worth fleshing out a touch more.

holy shit he said hypercard  now that is old school indy right there
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