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TIGSource ForumsDeveloperTechnical (Moderator: ThemsAllTook)Game Engines for Indie Developers
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motorsep
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« Reply #300 on: May 07, 2015, 07:10:47 pm »

I totally forgot to mention another great GPL engine - RTCW Coop: http://www.rtcwcoop.com/
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andrewmcwatters
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« Reply #301 on: May 16, 2015, 09:11:32 pm »

I've been working on Grid for a while now. It's actively maintained, and what would be considered a "complete game solution" since it takes care of more than just framework callbacks.

http://www.andrewmcwatters.com/grid/
https://github.com/Planimeter/grid-sdk
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deathbeam
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« Reply #302 on: July 02, 2015, 04:29:21 am »

I'm not sure if you'll ever read this, but make a tutorial for your Spooker framework, pretty please.

I abandoned that project long time ago, sorry :/

But I updated NON. Now it is really awesome and I think it solves all issues with Love2D mentioned in earlier posts. Such as Love2D is limited and only suited for small scale games. I solved this issue with NON by writing entire engine source code in MoonScript, so it can be easily modified and also added loading of Java libraries support to it. And we all know, that Java have tons of awesome libraries available. Also, forgot to mention that NON is now using MoonScript as its scripting language.

You can read more about NON here: http://nondev.io/
Or visit thread right here on TigSource: http://forums.tigsource.com/index.php?topic=46351
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eyeliner
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« Reply #303 on: July 17, 2015, 08:36:00 am »

I'm not sure if you'll ever read this, but make a tutorial for your Spooker framework, pretty please.

I abandoned that project long time ago, sorry :/
Nah... Can't get another language in my life right now. C# is enough work as it is. But thanksm, anyways.
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« Reply #304 on: July 17, 2015, 10:49:21 pm »

I've been using BlitzMax for years. It's easy to learn and use.

Also I've used MonkeyX (by the same developer which created BlitzMax) and made some simple mobiles games.

MonkeyX2 is coming soon and it looks pretty cool in the syntax department.
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Sos
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« Reply #305 on: August 07, 2015, 05:16:21 am »

I made jAllegro! It's like good old Allegro, but in js, and works in all browsers! Good for short jams and stuff1 Check it out Smiley
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deathbeam
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« Reply #306 on: August 18, 2015, 02:11:11 pm »

That is abit weird name, why not jsAllegro? When I looked at jAllegro name I thought it was Java.
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erlend_sh
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« Reply #307 on: August 23, 2015, 01:42:26 am »

Please add jMonkeyEngine. We just released our 3.1 alpha1.
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AleHitti
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« Reply #308 on: August 26, 2015, 01:39:46 pm »

Maybe add Godot? It's an open source 2D and 3D engine that is super light-weight (28mb). No install needed.

Here's the link:

http://www.godotengine.org/wp/
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TilemapKit
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« Reply #309 on: September 05, 2015, 03:12:18 am »

Not sure if this fits the "game engine" bill just yet.... Wink

I'm just about to release TilemapKit, a feature rich tilemap game development framework that natively supports all of Tiled Map Editor’s map types, settings and features. TilemapKit reads and writes TMX files, does all the nitty-gritty math for you, and then offers advanced features such as creating grids for pathfinding, flexible tile animations, normal-mapped lighting support and an optimized, multi-threaded renderer.

TilemapKit is a source code product compatible with SpriteKit, Cocos2D and custom Objective-C engines, and it will soon be available for Cocos2D-X/C++ engines. Its development is largely user-driven by voting on roadmap items as well as quickly supporting new Tiled/TMX features.

If you develop a tile-based game, you should definitely check out TilemapKit. If only to let me know you'd like that for engine X or that it ought to support feature Y. I'm relying on user feedback to further enhance it.
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ar2rsawseen
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« Reply #310 on: September 14, 2015, 09:09:55 am »

Can you add Gideros?
Link: http://giderosmobile.com/
License: MIT (https://github.com/gideros/gideros)
Supported platforms: Android/iOS/WindowsPhone/Windows/MacOSX/WindowsRT

2D and 2.5D Lua based game engine.

Pros:
Has instant on device testing and extendable using plugin systems

Cons: mostly limited to 2d games
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Victor911
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« Reply #311 on: December 21, 2015, 06:53:01 am »

Hi everyone
As for me I prefer two game engines instead of others: Unity and UE.
Here is a great comparison of them. http://www.program-ace.com/press-room/articles/unity-vs-unreal-engine-4-battle-of-giants
After them I'd like to notice CryEngine.
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bov930527
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« Reply #312 on: December 23, 2015, 07:50:06 pm »

I've read pretty much every responce up to page 7 and then I decided to skim quickly through the pages, and to my surprise, I didn't see anyone mentioning Microsofts XNA Framework. Now, I understand that some people may not agree that it could even be classified as a game engine, which is why I'm using the term "framework". Anyway, for anyone interested, I'll describe its functionality in this post.


- Free yet viable for commercial purpose. In fact, Microsoft incourages developers to use it to sell games.

- Being Microsoft it provides a substantial library aswell as documentation. A ton of online resources and tutorials are available, aswell as some really good high school and even university level paperback literature.

- It builds on top of Visual Studio and .NET, so everything within those frameworks is also available for implementation within XNA.

- It does the absolutely bare minimum what one would expect from a game engine. It loads and updates the graphics aswell as the game logic. That's it. All the physics have to be coded and all the graphics have to be done either by yourself in paint, or using some 3d modelling tool. Some people would say it's a con, but I dare say that it's really up to what the developer has in mind. What it does is it gives a complete freedom at the expense of hard work. The fact that you need to code ALL the physics may put off some developers, but the plus side is that it will guarantee that your game has a unique "feeling" to it. Also, it does not do any graphics for you, so all the models and graphics have to also be done by the developer, every little inch of it.

- Continuing from the last paragraph, as mentioned it does what it has to, but only what it absolutely has to, and then the rest is up to you. This means it is coding heavy. Not much is going to happen unless you know C#, which is the coding language for this framework. However, C# is pretty much a no-brainer for anyone familiar with the C family of langauages (C++, Java, etc.). For people who programmed in, say Python, it will require some time to learn and get used to.

(- C# is a whole discussion of its own, but I would like to just quickly point out how it differs from other languages. It is a bit more restricting than C++, in that it is much closer to the software level of development than it is to hardware. It is also almost primarily developed with object-oriented programming in mind, so folks from Java will feel right at home. However, it can come across as restricting at times. For 100% beginners, there is a lot of really good tutorials and literature on C#.)

- I would also like to add a bit more to the whole graphics/physics thing and why I think it's more of a pro than a con. It lets you start out small and go up, learning how to do the simplest things first, before moving on to greater projects. Ultimately, this is what makes it the absolutely best choice for beginning, or intermediate game developers (Because, lets be honest, you have to make games for sites like ArmorGames before you can make a game that will sell for 20$ on Steam). What it also does, is it lets the user understand all levels of game development, such as graphics, level design and physics. Since it doesn't do any on its own, it requires of the user to learn some about all of these fields in order to make it all work together. Doing so gives a perspective of what it truly means to be a one-man show in the indie territory. But again, and I can't stress this enough, if you have 3ds max laying at your side (or on you screen more like it), then your games will very much look as if you were using cryengine 3. (And seeing the pricetag for commercial license on cryengine vs using XNA combined with 3ds max, I'd much rather take the latter.)

If you have any questions or you saw factual errors in my post, please let me know.


Best Regards
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Layl
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« Reply #313 on: December 24, 2015, 06:55:59 am »

I've read pretty much every responce up to page 7 and then I decided to skim quickly through the pages, and to my surprise, I didn't see anyone mentioning Microsofts XNA Framework.

This is probably because the XNA Framework has been abandoned. It is not maintained anymore and the official installers don't even work with the newer Visual Studio versions. (there's unofficial "Refresh" installers though)

MonoGame is pretty much XNA's replacement. It has the exact same API but is still developed.
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bov930527
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« Reply #314 on: December 26, 2015, 01:40:57 am »

I've read pretty much every responce up to page 7 and then I decided to skim quickly through the pages, and to my surprise, I didn't see anyone mentioning Microsofts XNA Framework.

This is probably because the XNA Framework has been abandoned. It is not maintained anymore and the official installers don't even work with the newer Visual Studio versions. (there's unofficial "Refresh" installers though)

MonoGame is pretty much XNA's replacement. It has the exact same API but is still developed.

Wow, I didn't even know that, since I've been riding on VS 2010 and 2012 for some time now. I'll be sure to check out MonoGame. Thanks for the info!

Regards
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nem0
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« Reply #315 on: February 24, 2016, 01:39:17 pm »

There is a new open source 3D game engine - better than anything else Smiley - called Lumix Engine https://github.com/nem0/LumixEngine. It still WIP but there is already some interesting stuff to see.
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SolarLune
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« Reply #316 on: February 25, 2016, 01:08:36 am »

It sounds cool, but Windows only (?) kinda takes it down a peg. Certainly looks pretty great, though.

EDIT: Putting it out there on Reddit could also be a good idea.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2016, 07:45:26 am by SolarLune » Logged

Polly
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« Reply #317 on: February 25, 2016, 05:46:11 am »

better than anything else Smiley

Said the guy who created it ... Anyway, looks good so far + hello imgui Wink You might want to provide pre-compiled binaries though.
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nem0
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« Reply #318 on: February 26, 2016, 09:22:24 am »

Said the guy who created it

That's why I put smiley there Smiley

Precompiled binaries exists in different repo - https://github.com/nem0/lumixengine_data

I definitely plan to support other platforms than Windows, there are already github issues for that
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« Reply #319 on: March 12, 2016, 03:55:21 am »

Hey peepz, have you ever heard of Duality? It's pretty cool and similar to Unity when it comes to language (C#), IDE and component-based objects, but it's exceptionally for 2D games!

I've been also using Monogame, which is pretty cool. But I don't feel like spending time making a game engine with it once there are lots of engines for me to choose out there.

See ya! Beer!
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