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TIGSource ForumsCommunityDevLogsSTASIS -An Isometric SciFi Adventure Game
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Author Topic: STASIS -An Isometric SciFi Adventure Game  (Read 50288 times)
Christian Knudsen
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« Reply #20 on: February 15, 2012, 07:15:19 AM »

Never heard of that one before, but it seems quite simple to use and powerful enough for most adventure games. Cool.
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Laserbrain Studios
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« Reply #21 on: February 15, 2012, 08:49:35 AM »

Corrected: www.visionaire-studio.com

Sounds interesting, but has a fucked up licensing. No thanks.
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« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2012, 10:26:02 AM »

As mentioned by a lot of posters already, there's great graphics, presentation, and atmosphere here. Signed up for the newsletter, looking forward to more updates and a demo.
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Christian Knudsen
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« Reply #23 on: February 15, 2012, 10:34:22 AM »

Corrected: www.visionaire-studio.com

Sounds interesting, but has a fucked up licensing. No thanks.

Yeah, 1000 Euros for an "Unlimited Distribution" license seems quite steep.
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Laserbrain Studios
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« Reply #24 on: February 15, 2012, 11:31:26 AM »

Everything looks awesome, can't wait to see more details about gameplay.
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Chris Bischoff
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« Reply #25 on: February 15, 2012, 12:58:17 PM »

Thanks for the link fix! I wrote that reply on my phone in a coffee shop. :D

The licensing isn't to bad-the only restriction on a normal 35 Euro license is the price you can sell your product for.

The nice thing about the engine is that (AFAIK) it's the only actively developed Adventure Game engine currently on the market. Most of the engine updates are being requested by commercial developers, so they are all excellent, useful updates. Plus the guys are really nice, and will add in your suggestions if they get a chance!
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Christian Knudsen
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« Reply #26 on: February 15, 2012, 02:49:57 PM »

The licensing isn't to bad-the only restriction on a normal 35 Euro license is the price you can sell your product for.

There are also limits on distribution platforms, though...
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Chris Bischoff
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« Reply #27 on: February 15, 2012, 08:52:13 PM »

Currently the engine only supports PC, but they are working on a Mac and iPad build which should be out in the next few months.
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Christian Knudsen
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« Reply #28 on: February 16, 2012, 02:07:18 AM »

That's not what I was referring to. With the "Limited Distribution" license, you're only allowed to sell the game yourself or make it available from shareware platforms. So I imagine Steam and other digital resellers are out of the question, as are bundles that you're not organizing yourself.
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« Reply #29 on: February 16, 2012, 08:14:04 AM »

Kickstarter might be a good way to raise funds if you want to distribute it on Steam and such.  I'd be happy to donate to a project that looks as sexy as this.
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Chris Bischoff
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« Reply #30 on: February 19, 2012, 11:54:59 PM »

From my blog:

http://www.stasisgame.com/level-design-2/

I think its important when things make sense. Ive spoken before about level design before ( http://www.stasisgame.com/building-spaceships-the-hawking/ ) and making sure things work in a connected way.
Here is another example of that, and also a little glimpse into how I plan out and design the different areas of the game.



Each area starts out with the game script. A written description of the area, and how it sits in the story. When I wrote the game script, I kept the writing very ‘fluid’ , and reads very much a story treatment for a film, or a novel. There is nothing specifically ‘game related’ in the game script-its JUST the story.

From the script, I go into each area of the game, and design the flow of the rooms. I really want things to feel interconnected. If you enter one room, and leave through another door, where does that door go? Where does that corridor lead? Does the placement of the elevator shaft make sense in relations to the floors above and below? Now its important to note that quite a bit of this detail is ‘invisible’. The player will never notice where the elevator shaft enters and exits, but I think that on a subconscious level, if things aren’t flowing properly, it can take you out of the experience.
This is something I worked on this weekend, specifically ‘Crew Deck 14 F’.



From the hand drawn sketch, I fire up MAX, and build a very quick proxy of the area. Each room is represented by a simple square, and a label. I set up really quick cameras for each room, and position the cameras so that I can see how each room exists in relation to each other. This also allows me to add in the doors, and check that the flow of the particular area is working.



Then I start working on the bases for each area. Floors, walls, doors, etc. The advantage of working on multiple rooms at the same time is that I can very easily share assets in the scene. There are 2 Sleep Blocks which share assets. To double up the rooms, I just copied the completed room over, and started to alter the layout.



Once the floors and walls are in, I can start to add in the details in the rooms. Blood, bodies, papers, screens….
Interestingly, when I first to the layouts of the room, I start off creating the room as it would exist in its most ‘pristine’ state, and then I start to mess it up. I try to keep the flow of the story with the rooms. If there was some sort of carnage, where did it start? Would most of the damage be concentrated by the doors? Wouldn’t the surrounding rooms hear what was going on? If they did, would they have baricaded themselves into their room, or gone out to investigate? If they barricaded the room, what would they use? Would the dead bodies still be in the room? If they aren’t, where are they?
As I said before, I think that many of these details are invisible. They aren’t noticed by the player directly, but they all come together to create a believable world for the player to explore!



Then comes detailing, lighting, and colour correction. And here is one of the finished rooms, without any interaction elements rendered out (opening doors, steam, flickering screens, etc). Once all of the rooms in the area are completed, I go to each one and start inserting the puzzle elements into them.



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Franklin's Ghost
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« Reply #31 on: February 20, 2012, 05:43:49 AM »

That's a really in depth process, interesting to read and see how you've approached the game and story. Definitely feel that it'll pay off in making things seem real and balanced and not all artificial and sterile. Something you can definitely feel in games sometimes.
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« Reply #32 on: February 20, 2012, 05:51:00 AM »

I agree with the kickstarter idea, I would definitely support it if one got started.
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« Reply #33 on: February 20, 2012, 06:11:05 AM »

From my blog:   ...

Epic post. Thank you for showing us your process in such detail. It is really inspiring!

Absolutely consider a Kickstarter. This is an ambitious project that many would LOVE to see finished.
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« Reply #34 on: February 20, 2012, 06:34:53 AM »

I think KickStarter would be a cool option. I know I would back you up.
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« Reply #35 on: February 20, 2012, 08:21:34 AM »

really like the graphics and the whole colour scheme, it kinda reminds me of a noir comic Smiley
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Chris Bischoff
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« Reply #36 on: February 20, 2012, 09:00:58 AM »

Thanks guys. I have looked at crowd sourced funding, but really for where I am with the game it would be a last resort. An 'only if I had to' thing. I have enough personal funds to keep the game production going to the final product.

I also don't know if Kick Starter is available for us in deepest darkest Africa!

That's a really in depth process, interesting to read and see how you've approached the game and story. Definitely feel that it'll pay off in making things seem real and balanced and not all artificial and sterile. Something you can definitely feel in games sometimes.

Thanks man. Adventure Games are a genre that is VERY reliant on environment, and making the game isometric, its perhaps even more so. The environment, the world, is as much a character as...well, the characters themselves, so it really deserves as much attention as possible!

When the environment tells its own story, separate from the main spine of the game, I think that the player will have a more in-depth, and rewarding experience.

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Chris Bischoff
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« Reply #37 on: February 23, 2012, 11:40:42 PM »

Worked this week on a few new areas of the game, and expanded on some of the existing puzzles.

My plan is to work on content during the week (so I can render when Im at work), and then game logic on the weekends.
Its a little bit backwards, because honestly weekends are when I feel most creative, but the content generation takes MUCH longer than the coding, and the coding requires a much clearer head than the content generation (which can actually be helped by a little...wayward thinking!).

When do you guys get your stuff done? Or is usually 'spare time...must work!'
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Christian Knudsen
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« Reply #38 on: February 24, 2012, 12:49:08 AM »

I probably get most of my work done in the wee hours of the night. But I also squeeze in a bit of gamedev'ing whenever there's time. I work from home as a freelancer, so I can easily switch over to working on my game when there aren't any assignments I need to complete.
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« Reply #39 on: February 24, 2012, 01:12:10 AM »

Ive set up a TWITTER feed for those interested. Smiley

https://twitter.com/#!/StasisGame
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