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TIGSource ForumsCommunityDevLogsTIGForum Devlog Showcase
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GrahamOfLegend
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« Reply #40 on: July 07, 2014, 09:10:58 pm »

Woah, the games this week are pret-t-ty impressive. Vane & Heart Forth, Alicia are especially beautiful. Keep this up please Christian.  Toast Left
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« Reply #41 on: July 07, 2014, 09:17:32 pm »

Woah, the games this week are pret-t-ty impressive. Vane & Heart Forth, Alicia are especially beautiful. Keep this up please Christian.  Toast Left
I'll do my best! The second Q&A will be up later today

Next week, I'll post Showcases 3 and 4, since I'm going to Miami the following week so I'll be away from my computer for a while.
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« Reply #42 on: July 08, 2014, 06:33:24 am »

TIGForum Devlog Showcase #2: Q & A
-------

WildFactor on altering useless humans in Freaking Meatbags:
"Currently my favorite combination is the zombie equipped with a jet pack and a rocket launcher. The jet pack compensates for the slowness of the zombie ability so your almost human is harder to kill but still fast.

He can also fly above hills and shoots rocket which is always fun. This is the perfect weapon to attack instead of defending your base. There is one problem, the zombies will try to transform other humans zombie as well and make them slow.

So you need to keep them far away from normal humans as soon you land. Or if you have enough money, you can also buy a jet pack for everyone.

For the final version, humans will be able to get 2 additional arms to be able to lift more valuable ressources."


AlonsoMartin on Heart Forth, Alicia's seven year development:
"A lot of things have changed since, although not as many as I’d like. Many of the more engine-specific things like the game mechanics, the skills, many rooms of the world map, etc. definitely have changed for the better, but not so much the core/general aspects of the game, such as central elements of the story, the overall world map structure, etc. Those are very hard to modify once you’ve begun their execution.

I always find it very healthy to update things as you learn more about a specific subject. The way I see it, if changing smaller things is quick and easy and will bring great benefits, I usually go for it. But if such a change will take forever or will overcomplicate things, I generally just accept that I made a mistake and bite the bullet."


Netsu on the art deco/brutalist style in Heptych:
”We're aiming for everything to adhere to a particular version of art deco, starting from the environments to animations and the interface. Our take on the style is in the airy and towering proportions and symmetry you encounter in art deco buildings, but without curves and rounded corners everywhere apart from the main character's and bosses' designs. We want them to contrast with the spacious but harsh environments, both to keep a readable gameplay (which also informs the topdown camera perspective), and for Lore Reasons. Other influences for the art style are Tsutomu Nihei's and Moebius' work and some of the environments in E.Y.E. Divine Cybermancy."

dukope on choosing the setting and style of Return of the Obra Dinn:
"There's a couple things that led me into this project. Mainly I wanted to get (back) into 3d. I've done 3d in the past but my last few games have all been 2d. I'm really excited about VR and it seemed like a good idea to work on a 3d game next in preparation for the revolution. The 1-bit rendering is something I always liked on the Mac Plus and it's a nice restriction that forces me to be creative but also frees me up from having to make extravagant assets.

I originally envisioned the game set in an Egyptian pyramid but couldn't form a good mental image of how that could work well with my limited resources. I try to visualize the entire game from start to finish before starting work on it. Things always change during production but I just can't motivate myself until I can imagine a complete and interesting game.

I'm not sure how I ended up with a sailing ship; I've never had any particular interest in them. At some point I just realized that an old ship would be the perfect setting. The rendering style seems appropriate for the historical period, the scope of a single ship is manageable asset-creation wise, and given the number of people onboard and the inherent drama in the task of 1800's trade, there's good potential for an interesting story. As for why an East Indiaman specifically, I wanted to avoid the stuff you typically see in popular media. That rules out tankers, pirate ships, galleons, ships-of-the-line, cruise ships, etc and basically leaves East Indiamen - they were extremely important in their time but are largely forgotten now."


onebitpunch on combat mechanics and difficulty in Shadowcrypt:
"The combat mechanics is tactical in a sense that its very simple, but every little action that you do makes a difference. There are considerations to make, such as how you position your character in relative to enemies, when to attack or defend, your timing, and learning to anticipate & react to enemy attacks. Also there's a slightly puzzle-like aspect when encountering different enemies together within a room, as some enemies are melee oriented while some shoots projectiles, some walk faster than the others etc.. so you need to decide on how to best deal with each given enemy combinations.

I think the game can be initially hard since it requires some investment to learn the mechanics, and figuring out how the sword & shield are supposed to work together (both sword & shield are equal in terms of importance). The game will not hold your hand and you need to discover what the character can do for yourself. Whacking enemies carelessly will certainly result in a quick death. There are limited lives and players lose their weapon upgrades if they die, to emphasise the importance of becoming better at combat mechanics instead of relying on upgrades as a crutch. My hope is to turn every failure into tangible progress, so players are better equipped skill-wise to go a bit further at the game than they could before."


Zack Bell on deciding the core mechanics for SUPER III:
"For starters, the teleportation mechanic was something that I have had lying around for quite some time. Awhile back, I had met Tommy Refenes of Team Meat and decided to replicate the controls seen in Super Meat Boy. I got the controls feeling tight and was fiddling with several different maneuvers to be used as a double-jump replacement. One of the many was a dash that was very similar to what you may have seen in FROG SORD. Another was the teleport that you now see in SUPER III.

I prototyped SUPER III the IndiE3 Game Jam quite quickly. The level design was similar to Mario or Megaman titles. They were basically open, horizontal levels that left a lot of room for players to do as they please. However, limiting teleport distance was something that I wanted to avoid and long-distance teleporting left me with some jarring camera issues. To combat this, I made the levels more vertical and limited them to be a single screen wide. The screen-wrap was added to bring back some of the freedom and movement options that I lost by restricting the level size."


RasmusDeguchi on that awesome GIF of Vane:
"That there is what we call the stormwall, or the Get-The-Hell-Outta-There-You-Gonna-Die Wall - a giant wall made of sand and thunder that surrounds and threatens the world of Vane. It keeps the player at bay but is also a central part of the game."
« Last Edit: November 13, 2014, 08:06:22 am by Christian » Logged

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« Reply #43 on: July 08, 2014, 07:00:25 am »

Hey, just wanted to point out that it was Tim, the artist, who answered the question. I handle the more technical side of Heptych.

Thanks for including us! Hand Thumbs Up Right
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« Reply #44 on: July 14, 2014, 03:38:29 pm »

TIGForum Devlog Showcase #3 (7/14/2014)
Leaving for Miami on Saturday, so you guys get two Showcases this week
-------
This week, the games featured include:
  • Far Sky
  • Guild of Dungeoneering
  • Negspace
  • Sheltered
  • StarDiver
  • Telos

Far Sky
Devlog | Site | Steam page | Twitter | IndieDB
Status: Finished, released
Survive, explore, build, and descend ever deeper into the hazardous ocean depths


Guild of Dungeoneering
Devlog | Site | Steam Greenlight | Twitter | IndieDB
Status: Greenlit, releasing 2014
Build a dungeon to help your hero survive, play the early alpha demo


Negspace
Devlog | Site | Twitter
Status: Still in early development
Competitive physics-based dogfighting with atmospheric visuals, minimalist style


Sheltered
Devlog | Site | Kickstarter | Steam Greenlight | Twitter
Status: Very successful Kickstarter, Greenlit, mid-2015 release
Protect your family as you brave the nuclear apocalypse from your underground shelter


StarDiver
Devlog | Site | Greenlight Concepts | Twitter | IndieDB
Status: Still in early development
Story-driven sci-fi RPG across a procedurally generated universe, filled with exotic alien life


Telos
Devlog | Site | Twitter | IndieDB
Status: Very early in development
Fast paced FPS with spidermechs, grapple hooks, and zero gravity in abstract environments
« Last Edit: November 13, 2014, 08:06:12 am by Christian » Logged

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« Reply #45 on: July 14, 2014, 06:30:58 pm »

Telos! That movement style!
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« Reply #46 on: July 15, 2014, 05:55:18 am »

TIGForum Devlog Showcase #3: Q & A
-------

Spekler on choosing an ocean setting in Far Sky:
"Indeed, [the genre] is pretty saturated, and this is the main reason why I felt it was so important to bring a new universe to this genre. The ocean depths are amazing. It generates both admiration and fear to the player. Sadly, underwater gameplay is known to be often painful and difficult since you move slowly and in all the 3 dimensions which can be disorienting. I decided to remove all these "bad" mechanisms in order to keep the gameplay experience as enjoyable as possible. As the player wears an heavy diving suit, he can walk on the underwater ground and swim shortly using a bunnyhopping mechanism. It is way easier!

The second reason why I chose this environment is to avoid some technical difficulties. Indeed, Farsky is my first serious video game project and I made the entire 3d engine. It takes time, I needed an environment easy to render. As the visibility underwater is low compared to above water, map handling was easier. Also no hard shadow is needed. Just those two elements are already enough to remove an important amount of work. Thanks to this, I was able to focus my time on other important elements that adds beauty to the game, such as caustics, water particles, etc."


gambrinous on creating the concept of Guild of Dungeoneering:
"It started out as a prototype I built in a month which was just about laying dungeon tiles, inspired by board games like DungeonQuest and Carcassonne. Then when I started making it into a real game I added the hero, and for some reason I came up with the twist that you wouldn't control him which has really become the central point of the game. The cards I can't help, I think there'll be cards of some sort in every game I make!"

pnch on creating the visuals and atmosphere of Negspace:
”I was set on an as minimalist as possible, colorful aesthetic early on, as a break from the hairy 3d stuff I do daily for work, and a long b/w personal project. The self-imposed challenge is bringing in-game the feelings from real-life I want to, while keeping the focus on gameplay, asset creation manageable for a lone dev project,  and every gameplay frame looking OK for a small print Smiley.

As a boats and sailing lover, navigation in space games always felt a bit off for me.That´s where I borrowed the main inspiration and core gameplay feature from (a slightly more physically based approach to zero g maneuvering). I knew early on that, besides actual physics, a solid feeling of emptyness and scale would be needed to get the right feeling across, and that´s where the atmosphere art work started. Parallax layers are a classic way to portray wide expanses of "nothingness". Tilesets and procedural generation were also natural choices, since combining a wide array of small pieces is how they used to build things on old sci-fi movies, and these techniques work with a similar logic.

Besides art itself, camera work and editing are crucial to build an atmosphere (no sound yet!). I´m finding that actual gameplay mechanics can alter the game pacing in a way similar to film-editing, so I´m having fun experimenting with that, forcing quick climaxes of high-stakes gameplay between slow crescendos of tension as players zip through the level towards each other again, getting more and more careful as they get closer to each other."


meek on emotional connection to gameplay in Sheltered:
"It's actually our main focus for the game. Creating a connection between the player and the family is essential. Too few games explore emotional attachment these days, and it's something we're dedicated to achieving. We believe it'll make for a more enjoyable experience, and really up the tension and pressure in the game. "

friken on designing the aliens in StarDiver:
"Ah yes the aliens... StarDiver is my go at making a game in the vein of classics I loved as a kid. Two games series that I cherished growing up were StarFlight and Star Control. Both were story driven space epics. StarDiver is following in their footsteps and looking to create a universe teaming with life for players to explore and get lost in the lore and mirth. We started with a lose story arc and started creating ideas for aliens from there. My wife, being a talented artist, sketched all of the alien ideas on paper/pencil. Early on in the project we tried to digitize and render the sketches ourselves, however we found the results to be a less than ideal. We wanted a concept art / painted style for the game so we started hunting for a talented artist to join to project. A couple months ago we found just the right match and he has done an excellent job of taking the alien sketches, improving on them, and getting them ready for animation.
 
For animating them, we initially tried to use Spriter, which is a great kickstart sprite animation tool. However, Spriter was a bit buggy, in early development, and not quite working out for us so we moved to a Unity plugin tool called SmoothMoves. It has been working nicely. We are relatively new to animation, but have been able to get some reasonably nice results with a minimum of effort."


Justin Pierce on crafting Telos' mechanics
"Zero gravity and grapple hooks came from an older prototype I made back in 2010.  In that prototype, there was no gravity at all -- I wanted to explore zero g movement mechanics and the grapple hook was one way that I found made maneuvering in zero g more fun.  Using it felt like you were spiderman in space -- as a fan of stuff like TFC conc maps and CS surfing, I liked that it forced the player to think about movement differently.  I think a lot of the joy that comes from playing games is in mastering novel skills, so I'm always trying to create interesting mechanics for players to discover, enjoy learning, and use to their advantage.  

When I decided to return to the multiplayer shooter idea in 2013, I was weighing the pros and cons of zero g vs normal gravity -- while in the shower (where I probably do most of my game design) I had one of those taco girl moments and decided to prototype a system that had both.  I thought that prototype went well so now I needed a character that would fit and I ended up settling on a four legged mech that slides instead of walks.  If you think about it, it really fits well with the input system for a responsive FPS.  I think the way you move, turn, and aim in an FPS doesn't really fit that well with a human character -- for example, it's not really natural for a human to be running full speed, turn around 180 degrees in a split second, and maintain that speed while running backward.  But for a spidermech?  It's completely natural!  AAA studios can somewhat hide that awkward human movement with fancy mocap animations but I wouldn't be able to compete with that as an indie.  Plus, it looks neat when it transforms between zero g and normal g modes.  So more than anything, it was the mechanics that drove my decisions with the character design.  I should note that I'm still refining the designs and animations, though"
« Last Edit: November 13, 2014, 08:06:01 am by Christian » Logged

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« Reply #47 on: July 15, 2014, 01:40:14 pm »

Great reads there Christian & thanks for featuring Guild of Dungeoneering Gentleman
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« Reply #48 on: July 15, 2014, 01:58:53 pm »

Wow, I hadn't noticed StarDiver earlier -- I loved Escape Velocity and Star Control 2, so am super excited to see games like that.  Love their alien concepts, too Smiley

I wonder if Derek or Brandonnn would be interested in posting these on Tigsource or Venus Patrol respectively?  It was cool to see the old devlog magazines getting some extra exposure that way.
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« Reply #49 on: July 16, 2014, 04:09:58 am »

Would be cool if it was just Christian's posts in this thread and no noisy little comments like my post here, since this thread is basically an efficient valuable directory to other devlogs. It also means when we see that "new" post it's something good to see. Of course it's a cool thread though Smiley
« Last Edit: July 16, 2014, 04:16:04 am by alastair » Logged
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« Reply #50 on: July 17, 2014, 08:43:49 am »

Would be cool if it was just Christian's posts in this thread and no noisy little comments like my post here, since this thread is basically an efficient valuable directory to other devlogs. It also means when we see that "new" post it's something good to see. Of course it's a cool thread though Smiley
I don't mind. Any and all discussion/comments/options are encouraged here IMO. Or else why even bother posting these Showcases on a forum? The whole purpose is to spread awareness on these cool projects among the community and anyone else who might read through the thread
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« Reply #51 on: July 17, 2014, 08:44:58 am »

TIGForum Devlog Showcase #4 (7/18/2014)
Somehow Delver went two years and 230 pages without being featured, it's about time
-------
This week, the games featured include:
  • Death’s Gambit
  • Delver
  • Lone Wolf
  • Six Sides of the World
  • The Sun & Moon
  • Tolroko

Death’s Gambit
Devlog | Site | Twitter
Status: Still in early development, Kickstarter planned
2D action RPG inspired by Shadow of the Colossus and Dark Souls


Delver
Devlog | Site | Steam page | Twitter
Status: On Steam Early Access
First person roguelike set in chunky pixel dungeons


Lone Wolf
Devlog | Site | Steam Greenlight | Twitter | IndieDB
Status: Playable alpha, on Greenlight
Beat up punks as a post apocalyptic werewolf, with a cool art style and RPG elements


Six Sides of the World
Devlog | Site | Steam Greenlight | Twitter | IndieDB
Status: Releasing late 2014, on Greenlight, play early prototype here
Six sided puzzle solving across cubic planets, planned Level Editor


The Sun & Moon
Devlog | Site | Twitter | Ludum Dare
Status: currently being expanding into a full game
Manipulate inverse gravity, navigate tricky levels in this puzzle platformer


Tolroko
Devlog | Site | Twitter
Status: in development, build 1.00 recently released
Explore, fight, build across a Martian landscape inspired by the classic John Carter novels
« Last Edit: November 13, 2014, 08:05:51 am by Christian » Logged

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« Reply #52 on: July 19, 2014, 05:34:17 am »

The Devlog link to Tolroko is wrong. should be http://forums.tigsource.com/index.php?topic=27052.225
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« Reply #53 on: July 19, 2014, 06:10:31 am »

The Devlog link to Tolroko is wrong. should be http://forums.tigsource.com/index.php?topic=27052.225
Fixed, thanks
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« Reply #54 on: July 21, 2014, 08:37:38 am »

Thanks for posting up my game Lone Wolf!  For anyone who is a Unity developer, I've also been working on some tools that are open source and free.  I have a Unity PSD Importer http://forum.unity3d.com/threads/free-open-source-unity-psd-importer.254650/ and I've done a lot of work for Unity Sprites and Bones http://forum.unity3d.com/threads/219915-Release-Free-Unity-Sprites-And-Bones-2D-skeleton-animation which is a 2D skeletal animation system for which I am going to redo most of the animations with.  I also made an exporter called AnimationToPNG for Unity that you can take your animations and make them into PNG files, so you can use them outside Unity if you need.  Feel free to check them out, and I hope they help anyone with any 2D work they are doing in Unity.  I'll be posting more updates on my game after I have some animations finished with the tools, hope this helps some people out!
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« Reply #55 on: July 21, 2014, 10:19:07 am »

TIGForum Devlog Showcase #4: Q & A
-------

somn on combat in Death’s Gambit:
"Most bosses in games could be considered timed puzzles. We want our bosses to focus more on strategic thought-out play as opposed to twitch reflexes and button mashing. For example, we have a prototype boss encounter on an unbalanced platform. It's all about making sure there is enough weight on either side while you fight the boss. On top of that, he has multiple phases that each play with the mechanic in different ways. They are brutal in the dark souls way(you dodge roll and jump out of attacks) and on top of that, each boss has at least one mechanic that forces the player to solve some sort of combat system puzzle. Sometimes bosses will feel very challenging to some players before they realize there are multiple ways of tackling their mechanics."

Interrupt on the art overhaul in Delver:
Pending

lonewolf on creating the awesome concept of Lone Wolf:
”As a product of the '80's and '90's, when horror movies and the post apocalyptic scenarios reigned supreme(i.e. Mad Max, Fist of the North Star, The Terminator, The Howling, and An American Werewolf in London), I wanted to kind of merge all the fun things into a very tongue in cheek, over the top, comic book style brawler with some RPG elements to make it really unique.  I really missed the arcade beat-em up/brawlers of yesteryear and there are only a few great games that emulate that feel in recent history that come to mind.  One of them happens to be my good friend Tom Fulp's game "Castle Crashers" and the other is "Dragon's Crown", it is good to see that this genre is not dead, and I am hoping to add a bit of flavor to it with my title.  I very much wanted it to have 2D animated characters in a 3D environment giving it a new dimension to the sidescrollers we came to love.  In fact it is not a sidescroller at all, it's an open world where you can go back and forward as you please, because I want the players to feel like they are really trying to keep their character alive in a wasteland.  I'm hoping the concept will take off for the this generation as well as my generation, and it will be a very fun game with some familiar game mechanics that players who enjoy werewolves, martial arts, sci-fi, and post apocalyptic worlds will really find my game the right fit for their library!"

Cyberon on creating a level in Six Sides of the World:
"So, to design a level, I must have in mind which will be its purpose.
 
If I want to design an easy and straightforward level for the standard game progression, I usually add a new puzzle element or a new interaction between the elements already known by the player. That engages players, creating expectations on what will be the next surprise and also giving them a sense of wonder. These puzzles are very easy to understand and usually have a quiet paced gameplay, also, in the level design process I try not to add an explicit explanation about how the elements work, I try to combine the elements in a way that allow players to discover by themselves how elements work together, because it makes them feel clever, and also engages and enjoys them more than if I explain how things work every time they find something new.
 
That’s how I work when creating a level on the standard progression. But, what do I do when I want to create a level for hardcore and dedicated players? That’s the fun part. I build more than one puzzle on the same level when I want to create a new path out of the standard progression.
 
The geometry of the cubic planets and the use of several ones at the same time on a level allows me to create two or three puzzles which blend together in the same level, even sharing elements, each one with its own exit to a different level. I usually design one of the puzzles  to lead the player to the next level on  the standard progression line, and the other ones are designed with a difficult setting in mind, adding deadly traps, harder zones with difficult solutions or just a longer path to one of the exits. The exit of these puzzles can lead players to a harder and complex level where the solution of the puzzle is not so straightforward and maybe dangerous, or lead them to one of the special worlds where levels are designed with alterations of some of the game rules, like a black and white world where teleports have no color and players have to memorize where they lead; or a world set near a black hole where the level layout can be completely unexpected, just because they are not really composed by cubic planets.  That’s the way I create the challenging and rewarding experience for more dedicated players. It also adds a replayability layer to some of the levels: You have to visit them more than once, but, they feel different to play for each one of the exits to reach.
 
Designing the levels on this way, the game experience of each player will be the experience they want to live. They can just finish the game, or they can just try to solve every puzzle, easy or hard."


Daniel Linssen on building off the Ludum Dare version of The Sun & Moon:
Pending

dvoid on the inspirations behind Tolroko:
"The movie John Carter (2012) based on Edgar Rice Burroughs first book A Princess of Mars (1917) was the trigger that made me start the Tolroko project. Few movies since watching Star Wars as a kid has made me disconnect from reality like it John Carter did. The inspiration comes not so much from the story of the movie & books but from the setting. The world Mr Burroughs created with Barsoom is so different, so strange and far out that I just had to create such a world my self. The Barsoom books is part of a sub genre of science fiction called Sword & Planet or Planetary Romance. Sword & Planet science fiction often mix medieval settings & swashbuckling with a few high tech gadgets like ray guns or flying machines. This to me feels like the perfect setting for an open world explore,build,trade game. And just like in the Barsoom books, Tolroko will be much about the conflict for resources between the different species and tribes on the planet."
« Last Edit: November 13, 2014, 08:05:37 am by Christian » Logged

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« Reply #56 on: August 02, 2014, 03:49:48 am »

Don't worry, the Showcase isn't dead. I get back home tomorrow so expect a new Devlog Showcae early next week
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« Reply #57 on: August 02, 2014, 10:02:01 am »

Sounds good Christian! Can't wait Smiley
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« Reply #58 on: August 12, 2014, 01:33:54 pm »

Apologies for the delay; when I got back, I had this big backlog of games to play and write about that I'm still tackling.
If it's any consolation, the next Showcase will include:
- Caracal
- Greedy Guns
- Levity
- Planet Explorers
- Soft Bodies
- Tim Cosmonaut
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« Reply #59 on: August 20, 2014, 08:55:34 am »

Posts like this make my day.
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