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October 21, 2017, 02:08:24 am

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TIGSource ForumsCommunityTownhallForum IssuesArchived subforums (read only)Tutorials"Small Change, Massive Difference" - A Musical Tutorial Series!
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Author Topic: "Small Change, Massive Difference" - A Musical Tutorial Series!  (Read 2963 times)
amanfr01
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« Reply #20 on: July 17, 2016, 10:17:32 am »





My latest entry is here! This week's topic is all about changing up your Accompaniment Patterns! With the "Lost Woods" music from Ocarina of Time, I explain how accompaniment vastly affects the mood of your music. I've been on a Legend of Zelda music kick lately, and Koji Kondo is too good to pass up referencing his work.

Enjoy, and stay tuned for next week's video!

-Tony
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« Reply #21 on: July 24, 2016, 10:29:00 am »





Hello, everyone!

Want to make your spooky music "not-too-spooky"? Use the Oompah pattern! I delve into requested music from Beetlejuice as well as Ghouls'N Ghosts. Thank you to Da Neel for the music and topic requests! See everyone for the next video in three weeks. There's a very important wedding (mine  Wink) taking place on Friday, so my series will be on hold for a bit!

Thank you all for watching, and see you soon as a married man to the best woman in the world  Hand Thumbs Up Left

-Tony

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« Reply #22 on: August 01, 2016, 01:09:50 pm »

Thank you so much for these tutorials, they're exactly what I was looking for.
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« Reply #23 on: August 14, 2016, 12:16:15 pm »

Thank you so much for these tutorials, they're exactly what I was looking for.

No problem! I'm glad to help out where I can Smiley





My latest video is here, as well. I've returned from my honeymoon safe and sound (wife included  Cheesy). This week's video is all about the use of the Minor IV (iv) chord, making your music super sappy and nostalgia-inducing. Check it out!

As usual, let me know if you have any questions.

-Tony
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« Reply #24 on: August 23, 2016, 03:38:36 am »





My latest video was uploaded on Sunday! It's all about Mixed Meter. I transcribed "Marx's Battle Theme" from Kirby Super Star (one of my all time favorite Kirby games, and games in general). Throwing in alternative time signatures goes a long way to creating unexpectedness. If your listeners are thrown off slightly, your music will have far more interest.

Let me know if you have any questions! As always, stay tuned for next week's video on Sunday.

-Tony
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« Reply #25 on: August 28, 2016, 10:01:10 am »





This week's video is all about the Ostinato, which is a type of accompaniment pattern. Returning to the wonder of Yasunori Mitsuda's work on Chrono Trigger, I transcribed the "Corridors of Time" track. Ostinato patterns will help keep players focused (and prevent "game-overs" in critical moments)!

Thank you, as always, for tuning in each week. I've received some great feedback so far, so I hope you continue watching and continue learning.

Lots more in store when it comes to musical approaches through music theory!

-Tony
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« Reply #26 on: September 08, 2016, 02:33:01 am »





I forgot to upload this last weekend! In any case, this week's tutorial video is up and running. It's the start of a new subseries, so I hope you stay tuned.

It's AAAALLLL about form. Binary, for this video. The subseries will continue with other elements of musical form.

-Tony
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« Reply #27 on: September 13, 2016, 07:51:45 am »





My latest tutorial video was uploaded this weekend! Rearranging the title screen music from Final Fantasy 9 (like last week), I go into detail about Rounded Binary Form. It's very similar to Simple Binary Form, but slightly different in that it comes full circle. Hence, rounded Smiley

Enjoy! Let me know if you have any questions, and stay tuned for next week!

-Tony
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« Reply #28 on: September 27, 2016, 11:30:07 am »

Hello, everyone! Sorry for the delay in posting. But my most recent entry in this series was posted last week!





This episode continues the subseries of Musical Form, particularly with Rondo. I am proud and most definitely not ashamed to say that I'm also using Final Fantasy IX for this episode, as well! The soundtrack is just so good, and presents some wonderful examples for showcasing Musical Form.

Let me know if you have any questions!

-Tony
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« Reply #29 on: October 02, 2016, 11:17:52 am »





The final installment of my Musical Form mini-subseries! Last but not least: Strophic Form. 

Through transcriptions of power-up themes from Super Mario Bros. and Kirby's Dream Land, I demonstrate the use and effectiveness of Strophic Form in video games!

An easy form to comprehend, but sometimes hard to master. Let me know if you'd like any assistance in your work!

PLUS, as an added bonus, I reference my offer for private lessons toward the end of this video. If you want more information right here and now, you're welcome to click this link which sends you to my services page. I hope to work with some of you down the line!

Stay tuned for next week Smiley
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« Reply #30 on: October 13, 2016, 05:22:52 pm »

Watched the first few episodes and I really like what you're doing here. Even though these are all concepts I'm familiar with (so far), some of the terminology and rumination on the tonal effects a technique has on a piece are novel to me. Though I've certainly found myself using a dissonant/consonant drone, the 'pedal point' nomenclature is entirely new to me.
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« Reply #31 on: October 14, 2016, 02:31:29 am »

Watched the first few episodes and I really like what you're doing here. Even though these are all concepts I'm familiar with (so far), some of the terminology and rumination on the tonal effects a technique has on a piece are novel to me. Though I've certainly found myself using a dissonant/consonant drone, the 'pedal point' nomenclature is entirely new to me.

Hey there! Thank you for the feedback! I'm glad these videos can be of use. That's what I aim to achieve; even if some of these are common knowledge through action or product, understanding the theoretical reasons why those actions or products work is so important!

I'm just thrilled that I can be a help to you Smiley. Let me know if you have any questions down the line. Never hesitate to shoot me an email!

P.S. - I read about your game project, "Eve," and it sounds quite interesting! I hope to see more down the line Smiley
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« Reply #32 on: October 14, 2016, 07:57:40 am »

Thanks! The project is actually 'EverEnding' now, I just haven't gotten around to changing the header image, assuming that was where you saw the old title. There are some obvious google issues with the title 'Eve' that dissuaded me from its use.

Also, it's a minor thing, but right now the playlist is in order of newest first, so if I want to watch them in order I have to stop each video at the end and move to the next manually. Might want to reverse the order.
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« Reply #33 on: October 16, 2016, 04:30:12 am »

Thank you for the heads up! I switched it. It must have been set to go in the opposite order. All the videos are properly ordered now Smiley





My latest video is here! If you are shooting for Eerie, Haunting, or Unsettling, consider using unaccompanied melodies.  I demonstrate this through my transcription of Final Fantasy 7's "Who Are You?" by Nobuo Uematsu. The soundtrack is just so good for music theory examples. It proves that Nobuo Uematsu is a mastermind and genius of music.

Plus, the floor is still open for private lessons. I'd love to work with you each individually. Let me know if you have any questions!

-Tony
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« Reply #34 on: October 30, 2016, 09:04:24 am »





Secondary dominants are important in creating interesting music. It's often overlooked, and truly isn't too difficult. The concept itself is a little more intermediate / advanced, regarding harmony, but once mastered it can add a great deal to your tunes. Learn all about them through my transcription of the "Ground Theme" from Super Mario Bros.

I hope this helps you music-makers out there!

-Tony
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« Reply #35 on: November 14, 2016, 04:52:06 am »





Banjo-Kazooie holds a wonderful example of Secondary Dominants. This video is an introductory lesson to the Circle of Fifths, which is a wonderful tool to help control your game music's harmony!

Hopefully this helps you discover the potential of music theory and how understanding it can really benefit your music! Questions are always accepted, so I hope to talk to some of you soon Smiley

Plus, the floor is still open for private lessons. I'd love to work with each and every one of my viewers!

-Tony

-Tony
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« Reply #36 on: November 27, 2016, 11:03:03 am »





I can't believe I'm on episode #026 with this! I'm very excited Smiley

This video covers basic variation in orchestration. Through a transcription of Koji Kondo's "Termina Field" from Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask, I describe how a slight shift in musical texture affects the track's overall character. For more detailed descriptions on orchestration technique, be sure to watch my tangential series, Orchestration Station!

Let me know if you have any questions or want to look into private lessons for any of your personal music needs!

-Tony
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« Reply #37 on: January 01, 2017, 11:34:09 am »

My latest video is up! I hope you all had a lovely Christmas and Happy New Year! This one focuses on the concept of "Motivic Unity."





While using a single motive solely within a specific track is a great way for compositional organization, having motives return throughout other tracks in an entire soundtrack goes a long way in impacting your audience! Through Grant Kirkhope's "Banjo-Kazooie" soundtrack, I demonstrate the idea of motivic unity. His music is magnificent in demonstrating this, and I hope you find ways to incorporate your own motives throughout your whole game's OST!

Let me know if you have any questions or want to look into private lessons for any of your personal music needs! I'm offering a New Year discount for new students from now until February 1st, 2017!

-Tony
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« Reply #38 on: January 08, 2017, 10:13:41 am »

My latest episode is here!





This video discusses the concept of "contrary motion" in its simplest form, particularly involving the melody and the bass. While contrary motion covers many aspects of music, it's best to discuss one use at a time; I'll talk about it more in detail in a subsequent video! I demonstrate its effectiveness at cadences through my transcription of "Rosalina's Observatory" from Super Mario Galaxy, composed by Koji Kondo.

If you're interested in private lessons for any of your personal music needs, I'm offering a New Year discount for new students from now until February 1st, 2017!

Keep up the awesome work, developers/musicians!

-Tony
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« Reply #39 on: January 23, 2017, 09:45:06 am »

My latest video has arrived!





This video continues my discussion on Contrary Motion, except this time extending beyond just final cadences. I demonstrate its use through my transcription of Nobuo Uematsu's "To Zanarkand" from Final Fantasy X. Effective counterpoint (AKA "contrapuntal motion" is establishing independence between musical voices, and contrary motion is a key player in doing so!

Let me know if you have any questions or want to look into [ur=http://www.manfredoniamusic.com/private-lessons]private lessons[/url] for any of your personal music needs!

-Tony
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