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zarxto
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« on: September 05, 2016, 05:52:51 PM »

So, its been about 3 months since I've been on this forum. The reason was is because I've taken a break from documenting everything all in one forum about a game that would (probably) never come out.

You see the thing is I was going to make an earthbound size RPG. and that would've taken so much time to finish especially by a man who has barely even conceived any form of something related to a final game.

I'm not saying this isn't possible. But if you're like 15 and you're starting this game, you will probably have your own house by the time you finish working on the game.


The game I was going to create was flowerhead, I mean the names atleast kind of catchy? I may even use it for a future game. But as of now I've made tons of mistakes that I think you guys should never do

1. I never documented what I exactly wanted in that game, I just memorized it.

The reason why you shouldn't do this is because you can always mix memories up and nothing could be executed correctly as
much as you planned it to be.

2. I wanted a blockbuster mechanic in the RPG. (like for example I wanted something big like have a minigame within the
rpg battle screen like how undertale did it)

Unfortunately, that's extremely difficult to accomplish. If you're planning to make an RPG. Don't worry if it looks generic or not because its your first game anyways.

3. Only work on this game

Now this is a weird reason. But while your making a big game it would be wise to maybe release some small minigames to get the
hang of coding and referencing every line of code you have for that game. So that if its similar to the other big game you could copy similar lines of code onto that.


I was using Game Maker also might I remind you. This was around when Undertale was getting the craze all over the internet so the game I was making was heavily influenced by undertale.

I also was extremely arrogant when people would make negative responses to my post. I would also make a mockery of myself on the forums because apparently its looked down upon to be immature here.



Also, Don't waste your time here 24/7 nothing here genuinely matters except for learning a few things and getting feedback. Nothing else.
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voidSkipper
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« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2016, 06:57:36 PM »

Experienced devs tell people time and time again that their grand idea is far too big for a first (or second, or fifth) game, but it's really something that people just need to learn for themselves.

It's just a reality of game development that people get into this hobby when they're young, inspired and self-assured. It's a bad mix because it means you're not able to grasp the scale of things properly, you're dead-set on a goal, and anyone who tells you otherwise is the bad guy.

Hell, that narrative is practically what you get fed in every RPG, right? Inexperienced kid takes on the world despite everyone's warnings, and pulls it off anyway against all the odds. Bang your head against something long enough and you're guaranteed to break through. Etc.

What I'm getting at is that there's no shame in what you've experienced, and that the fact that you've managed to get your head around those three concepts in three months is quite admirable.


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« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2016, 03:15:52 AM »

An Earthbound-sized RPG is too much even for one person. Earthbound is massive. Undertale's a lot of times smaller.
For that i would need a team, even a small one, but no one said it is not possible: just too long. But i'm sure people like Stephen Hawking would develop a game like that only with the power of black holes but that's unrelated.
And well, if you're just 15, you shoudn't expect to make a massive game already, a videogame takes time to make. But these are just mere assumptions.

But that may be an advantage: if you're just 15 you have all the time to learn Game Maker. I wouldn't lose this chance. Well, i'm just 23 and i think i've wasted my entire life but i shouldn't think so, i have all the time too. But, seriously, if you want to make it as an videogame developer you HAVE to want it.

I would recommend this and this read. They're ones of the very few positive articles you can find.
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« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2016, 03:39:10 AM »

You're like 15 years old, never made a tangible project and giving advices as an Indie Dev?

So, its been about 3 months since I've been on this forum.
you made your flowerthing devlog in 2015, and we're already in september 2016. You've been on this forum for longer than 3 months, why lying?


2. I wanted a blockbuster mechanic in the RPG. (like for example I wanted something big like have a minigame within the
rpg battle screen like how undertale did it)

[...]I was using Game Maker also might I remind you. This was around when Undertale was getting the craze all over the internet so the game I was making was heavily influenced by undertale.
I also was extremely arrogant when people would make negative responses to my post.
Remember that some of your posts were about you being pissed because Toby made Undertale before you made it because you had the exact same idea? You reacted negatively when people told you that you were just copying Undertale.

apparently its looked down upon to be immature here.
lel


If you want to become an indie dev, you should probably stop looking for programmers and promise a profit share.
At your age you're flexible enough to learn fast. you're not a businessman yet.
because this is ridiculous ->
Looking for programmer to help me in an RPG (WILL BE PAID)

Anyways, If the game takes off i'll be able to pay you 30% of the money earned from the game. It'll be fairly divided so don't worry.

Anyways, my skype: zarxto  if there is 3 profiles popping up just add all of them

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« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2016, 02:17:06 PM »

Zarxto, don't make straight jacket rules, make games. If you enjoy making games whether you finish them or not is pretty irrelevant. Do it because it is something to do, you don't need any more justification than that. Don't lose yourself trying to create the next video game masterpiece, try to create your next moment of enjoyment. Even when it gets tough it can still be very enjoyable, like a challenging puzzle that has you stumped but you you can't help but feel satisfaction trying to solve it.

Yeah, you blundered and gave off a bad impression. It happens and it is likely to continue to happen (humanity's curse). Much like making a game, making a decent person of yourself is a difficult process of problem solving and resource building. Bad choices are not a mantle of shame, they are more like a bugs in a game that illuminate a problem in the underlying behavior process. Figuring out what drives certain behaviors in you is a good step towards crushing those bugs and moving forward. My favorite quote is "Today is victory over yourself of yesterday, tomorrow is victory over lesser men." (I have it tattooed on my arm). Even just knowing and being able to admit what you did wrong is growth, a step ahead of where you were prior. I don't think you are immature, I think you are battling a wall of frustrations and disappointments but still learning. You'll get there soon enough.

I disagree with the sentiment that nothing here genuinely matters. There are a lot of great people here, there are a lot of great works here, there is a lot here that matters. You can manage your priorities without being dismissive.

Anyways, I'd personally like to see you continue your pursuit into game development. As long as you remain at least honest to yourself about where you are at and willing to put in work I think you will progress at a fairly decent pace. Should you need help with something and think I might be able to help feel free to ask. Good luck!  CoffeeToast Right



You're like 15 years old, never made a tangible project and giving advices as an Indie Dev?
Sure, why not? The source of advice is not as important as its utility. Either you think it is not true and you just ignore it or you find some truth in it and it is worth thinking on.

So, its been about 3 months since I've been on this forum.
you made your flowerthing devlog in 2015, and we're already in september 2016. You've been on this forum for longer than 3 months, why lying?
He had two devlogs, one was made November 2015 and the other was made December 2015. Maybe he was blatantly lying but I can't really imagine why he would since it's really not something worth lying about. I am thinking he probably threw a hasty guess out there and just underestimated how long its actually been. I could be wrong, of course, but that is what it seems like to me.



Zarxto, I am inclined to agree with Bakkusa about not trying to hire or profit share at this point. You're still in the learning phase, take the time to ride that out and develop your skills a bit more. Really iron out your vision and get a clear design document going (if you plan to bring in others).

Even if you are dead-set on hiring others, you want to learn enough creative skills that you can really understand the workload you are asking of your artists, musicians, etc. and have a better appreciation for their efforts. It also allows you to communicate more effectively with them. Learning some color theory, for example, allows you to communicate more clearly to your artist what colors you want the scene to have beyond just saying "Yeah, it needs to be all dark and scary" or something.

You'll attract a lot more help if you know your shit.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2016, 02:28:48 PM by JWK5 » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2016, 04:27:59 AM »

We've all got those battle scars dude. Well done, learning to stop and take stock is a valuable lesson in all aspects of life not just gamedev. You'll be better next time but you still might fail. Hell I've been making games for 25 years and I canned a game three years ago after six months because we couldn't make it fun. Live, learn, move on.

Good luck in what ever you do next.
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« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2016, 04:00:08 AM »

you should start small (imho), I've worked more than 10 years now doing games... and for my personal projects still go small. I mean I've found big satisfaction in finishing stuff, this is a training you must do, I mean the first months of game development are the most satisfying, then you get the valley of discouragement where you drop things off, just make sure you pass this valley and then you get a finished product.

This is made by training though... you must do it several times to accommodate your mind to it. So when I tell now people to start small is just to make sure they're able to finish their games and get this training on closing stuff.

If you've got a great idea with 15 yo, you'll for sure have a new one after 10 years of training, also it will be more settled and more reasoned than the "let's make a World of warcraft, in one year". Also make sure to understand what other have done, for instance how much people worked on this game I like: wow 30 people, how much time they dedicated: wow 3 years, then maybe this is too big for me alone... just make sure you understand what your quest is.

those are my opinions and my 2 cents if they're of use for you.
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« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2016, 05:42:05 AM »

http://www.onegameamonth.com/
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zarxto
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« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2016, 07:02:37 AM »

You're like 15 years old, never made a tangible project and giving advices as an Indie Dev?

So, its been about 3 months since I've been on this forum.
you made your flowerthing devlog in 2015, and we're already in september 2016. You've been on this forum for longer than 3 months, why lying?


2. I wanted a blockbuster mechanic in the RPG. (like for example I wanted something big like have a minigame within the
rpg battle screen like how undertale did it)

[...]I was using Game Maker also might I remind you. This was around when Undertale was getting the craze all over the internet so the game I was making was heavily influenced by undertale.
I also was extremely arrogant when people would make negative responses to my post.
Remember that some of your posts were about you being pissed because Toby made Undertale before you made it because you had the exact same idea? You reacted negatively when people told you that you were just copying Undertale.

apparently its looked down upon to be immature here.
lel


If you want to become an indie dev, you should probably stop looking for programmers and promise a profit share.
At your age you're flexible enough to learn fast. you're not a businessman yet.
because this is ridiculous ->
Looking for programmer to help me in an RPG (WILL BE PAID)

Anyways, If the game takes off i'll be able to pay you 30% of the money earned from the game. It'll be fairly divided so don't worry.

Anyways, my skype: zarxto  if there is 3 profiles popping up just add all of them






Well first off, I made tiny mistake of saying that I only joined 3 months ago, I ment to say when I made this post that I had taken a break for three months.

Also buddy, I'm not 15, I'm 17. Jesus Christ time goes by fast doesn't it? 

apparently its looked down upon to be immature here.


Yeah, It is looked down upon. If you're being a complete prick on the forums you're obviously gonna have a ton of dirt on you.
 
also, whats wrong with paying someone to help me work on a game? I know some type of programming but I'm not nearly as skilled enough to work upon a gigantic game just by myself alone. I do think that if I worked on it Artistically Creatively and did the writing of the game It would be atleast somewhat decent and I would have someone help me with the programming part.

I actually despise this reputation that I've gained because people can easily see what you've said and done and it would be super easy to contradict yourself. If I ever work on another project. I'll probably do it on another name.


"Remember that some of your posts were about you being pissed because Toby made Undertale before you made it because you had the exact same idea? You reacted negatively when people told you that you were just copying Undertale."

Yeah, and I admit that. But honestly now that I look back the only thing I really want to emulate that is similar to Undertale is probably the character writing and how they go along with the story correctly. I probably did try to make a clone back then but now I just don't frankly care about that stuff anymore. 
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« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2016, 12:05:26 PM »

Well, you're trying to learn to do better so that is a good first step.  CoffeeToast Right
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« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2016, 12:17:51 PM »

I was lucky enough to start small. It ended up being FAR bigger than I thought it would be, so it all worked out.
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« Reply #11 on: October 07, 2016, 04:58:54 AM »

Yep. Even the smallest seeming project can be huge when taken to completion. The game I am currently working on, a small infinite jumper, has taken longer than I thought.

Turns out, the last 20% of the work to be done takes 80% of the time.
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« Reply #12 on: November 15, 2016, 02:43:32 AM »

I highly recommend this talk:



I think Rami explains a lot of stuff that we have to keep in mind as we developing a game. This is that kind of content that every indie should watch and applies really good to the vast majority.
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« Reply #13 on: November 15, 2016, 12:57:21 PM »

Thanks a lot for posting that video. That was just fucking great. Really loved the Dunning-Kruger part.

Quote
Oh go fuck yourself, I know what I'm doing. I'm playing guitar. I've played a song before. Who do you think you are?


Also the part about the about self-care.



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« Reply #14 on: November 17, 2016, 03:39:43 PM »

That last point rang true to me - it's tough, I use to work on side projects all the time. ie. they pop up more and more. Learned hard way - at least for me, you need to work on your main game. Smiley I know that seems obvious, but tough in practice.
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« Reply #15 on: November 23, 2016, 11:06:06 AM »

I disagree with the sentiment that nothing here genuinely matters. There are a lot of great people here, there are a lot of great works here, there is a lot here that matters. You can manage your priorities without being dismissive.

Very true, and this thread is an example. Such good advice being shared here  Coffee
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