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TIGSource ForumsCommunityTownhallForum IssuesArchived subforums (read only)Tutorials"Orchestration Station" - A tutorial for Composers and Music Makers!
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Author Topic: "Orchestration Station" - A tutorial for Composers and Music Makers!  (Read 1486 times)
amanfr01
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« on: September 27, 2016, 11:27:52 am »

Hello, everyone! Tony Manfredonia, here, and I've just started a new tutorial series specifically designed for composers. Particularly made for improving your orchestration.

From concert and theatrical music, to video, game, or multimedia music, Orchestration Station will guide you along the ways of effective orchestration. Through examples of music of public domain, I will explain orchestration strategies of some of history's greatest music.

This first entry is all about "Passing the Baton," or exchanging a similar idea between sections of the orchestra. In particular, subsections of the Strings. Enjoy!



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« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2016, 01:41:37 pm »





My latest "Orchestration Station" tutorial is here! In this week's entry, I go into detail about the Pizzicato technique. Some dos (and don'ts), as well as some general usability. Strings are frequently seen as strictly bowed instruments, especially for composers / music-makers who are unfamiliar with the instrument.

That being said, through my transcription of Benjamin Britten's Simple Symphony, I hope you learn a bit about "arco" and "pizzicato" for your orchestration needs!

-Tony
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« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2016, 10:20:25 am »





Here's my latest "Orchestration Station" video! Want to add some "snap" to your string writing? Found out how in my latest Orchestration tutorial video! Through an excerpt of Bela Bartok's String Quartet No. 4, I instruct you how to give your strings a bit more percussive oomph than standard pizzicato notation.

Although the piece itself is fairly contemporary, I hope this video helps you keep up some unique string writing! Strings are powerful instruments, indeed. Let me know if you have any questions or would like private lessons. My inbox is always open!

-Tony
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« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2016, 05:05:37 am »





Using "Divisi" is a multi-purpose instruction for string sections in an orchestra! I demonstrate this idea through a piece of my own, called "A Tale of Separation."

With some feedback, I will ensure that each video can apply to you music-makers out there who use 100% electronic sequences. Tips will be given both from a notation standpoint as well as a sequencing standpoint.

I hope you enjoy these videos and that each technique provided helps you in your orchestration process!

-Tony
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« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2016, 04:34:28 am »





Hello, everyone!

Through a piece of my own, I demonstrate the string technique and orchestration instruction called Col Legno. Strings aren't always about lush; this technique has them striking the strings with the wood of the bow, creating a unique percussive texture.

Let me know if you have any questions or would like private lessons. My inbox is always open!

-Tony
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« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2016, 11:19:57 am »





Through a work of my own, I demonstrate the use (and technique) of String Harmonics! Bringing the glassy, crystal-like texture to your music can be a tough concept to understand, but incredible once mastered. I cover the basics of the Overtone Series, as well as two approaches to the technique itself: Natural and Artificial Harmonics.

Again, definitely a more challenging concept to understand (especially if you're not a string player), so I welcome any questions you may have!

-Tony
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« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2016, 12:36:55 pm »

Hey that's cool to know!

The only harmonics I've ever been able to produce was through some carefully-fingered plucking on a guitar.  I played violin (after that I want to get my hands on a cello of maybe a stand up bass one day) in my youth and I had no idea you could even get harmonics out of one.

Also the difference in harmonics from different instruments gave me pause...I remember the guitar harmonics being "crystalline" for lack of a better word.  The violin harmonics are something else, they got potential to be creepy or even purposefully discordant.

Keep the vids coming sir, good stuff all around  Coffee
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« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2016, 06:04:12 am »

Thank you so much, NoLocality! My apologies for replying so late. I'm glad you enjoy these videos as well Smiley Strings are incredible <3





Here's my latest video, discussing balancing out the overall dynamic level of the orchestra! With a straightforward formula, you can safely compose your music that one orchestral group will not overpower the other. It can be tough to grasp at first, but with a little practice, the formulaic concept of balancing resonance will help you out immensely!




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« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2016, 04:46:39 am »





Feeling overwhelmed by a large ensemble?

This Orchestration Station entry is all about a well-known type of orchestration workflow. Writing in Short Score is highly effective to both allow the brain to focus on one composition tactic at a time, as well as organizing your creative process. Plus, it's immediately less daunting if you're yearning to compose for an orchestra and feel intimidated by its sheer size!
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« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2017, 06:28:10 am »

My latest entry of "Orchestration Station" is here!





This entry is all about limiting your instrumentation when writing for an orchestra. It helps provide coloristic variety, as well as giving the music room to breathe! Just because you plan on writing a soundtrack or a piece for a large ensemble, doesn't meant that each instrument needs to play all the time. Often times, less is more!
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« Reply #10 on: January 31, 2017, 05:49:53 pm »

Woah - didn't realize these were on TIG Tony!

What I do is I just load up instances of Kontakt until I hit 100% CPU. I delete a couple... Boom orchestration! Wink

j/k

It's cool you're making these videos!
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« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2017, 04:01:20 am »

Good morning, everyone! My latest video is here, and episode 10 of "Orchestration Station" is highly relevant to video game music makers out there.





The concept of Breathing in woodwinds is highly overlooked, especially in fully sequenced music. In this video, I discuss not only its importance, but some workarounds to fill in those gaps of audio when the player (or in most cases, sample library) takes a quick breath.

Thank you for watching, and stay tuned for next week!

-Tony
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« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2017, 03:17:30 am »

Episode #011 is here!





This entry is similar to my "Passing the Baton" video for strings, but when it comes to winds, its effect has different benefits and uses! It continues my discussion on Breathing, as well, as that has importance to the topic at hand today! Through an excerpt of Bedrich Smetana's "The Moldau," I demonstrate how to "pass the baton" to continue a single woodwind color.

Thank you for your time, and I hope this helps with any woodwind writing concerns you may have had!

-Tony
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« Reply #13 on: March 06, 2017, 03:01:11 am »

Happy Tutorial Monday!





In another life, I'd probably be a bassoonist. Woodwinds are my favorite instrumental family, and the bassoon takes the cake! From its technical capacity, its range, as well as its specific and well-known characteristics, writing for the bassoon opens up a world of possibilities for your music. Through Mozart's Concerto for Bassoon in Bb, as well as my own piece, "The Odd Folk and the Man of Joy," I instruct some benefits and notation tips on writing for the bassoon.

Have an awesome week, and stay tuned for my next video.

-Tony

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« Reply #14 on: March 20, 2017, 02:40:44 am »





Happy Woodwind Monday!

Writing for the woodwinds can be tricky. Today's video clarifies some common "unknowns" about the primary four woodwind instruments. What's their range? How about their dynamic curve? What do they generally sound like and accomplish in these ranges? There's no transcription, but I hope this brief overview helps you even in the slightest the next time you're composing for these instruments.

Enjoy, and see you next week!
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« Reply #15 on: April 12, 2017, 03:09:47 pm »

Hey everybody! My latest Orchestration Station video is here!





This video discusses the technique of "Orchestral Unison." While it might sound straightforward - or even limited - there are workarounds to certain complications you might run into. Through an excerpt of Beethoven's 9th symphony, I discuss how to approach a moment of orchestral unison to effectively emphasize a musical line!

Thank you for your time, and never hesitate to reach out regarding private lessons! They're a blast, and I'll be working with some new students this upcoming week.

-Tony
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« Reply #16 on: June 02, 2017, 02:39:53 am »

Hello, everyone! I'm back in action after a much-needed break from making videos.





This video discusses vertical chord placement, specifically through woodwinds due to the nature of the instrument group. When you have a ton of instruments at your disposal, it can be hard to determine vertical relationships between instruments. What I mean by that is from top to bottom. Who has the high note? Which instrument do I put the third of the chord in? Do I double or not double with other instruments in this vertical plane? I do my best to answer these types of questions for you.

Thanks for watching, and never hesitate to contact me for private lessons. As of now, I have plenty of room for new students! It'd be great to work with you; it's been so rewarding to see my current students grow in their specific projects.

I look forward to speaking with you all, and thanks again for watching!
-Tony
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« Reply #17 on: June 22, 2017, 07:43:16 am »

My latest "Orchestration Station" video has arrived!





Today, I want to introduce to you Secondary Melodies. Like "Melody and Accompaniment," this adds a third texture to the ensemble. Through Mozart's "Symphony in E-flat, K. 543, I demonstrate the benefits of including secondary melodies throughout your music!

Please reach out if you’re interested in the various packages of private lesson I offer. Right now I have a few different students who work with me weekly, bi-monthly, and everything in between. I’m very flexible when it comes to scheduling. It’d be awesome to work with you all!

Enjoy the video!
-Tony
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« Reply #18 on: July 06, 2017, 05:48:35 am »

Writing for brass can very tricky. So much so that it often presents common problems for composers (simply because they don't know enough information about the instruments!). This video is my first discussion on Brass instruments, particularly the Horns. I hope this helps you in your Horn-writing adventures!



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« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2017, 10:41:17 am »

This "Orchestration Station" episode covers a general overview of the trumpet's characteristics, as well as brief excerpts showcasing effective trumpet writing, as hard as the passages might be! I hope this helpful and whet's your appetite to dig into the depths of orchestration; brass writing is no joke, and the more knowledge you can learn, the more effective you'll find your work!





Thanks for watching, and never hesitate to contact me for private lessons. I love working with new students! It'd be great to work with you if you're available.

I look forward to speaking with you all, and thanks again for watching!
-Tony
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