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TIGSource ForumsCommunityTownhallForum IssuesArchived subforums (read only)CreativeCollaboration Success Stories
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sanwayzar
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« on: November 24, 2016, 10:50:13 AM »

Hey indies, got any stories of successful collaborations to share with us? Have you been able to find people to work with on your games here on TIGSource or elsewhere?

I am very interested to hear about your experience and advice in finding collaborators/partners/co-founders/team-mates for indie dev. I'm sure there are others here who would like to learn from what you have to say, too. Smiley

How did you find other devs to work with? How long did your search take you? Were you able to complete and release any games together? Do you still work together? Any advice towards success, and warnings of pitfalls to avoid that you can share with us?

Thank you for your wisdom! 
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GAME-O-GAMI: making games with character - http://www.game-o-gami.com/ <br /> <br />My Art Portfolio: http://www.sanhueza.com/
TEETH
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« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2016, 07:55:38 AM »

It's great if you have the personality for it. But if you find it hard to talk to people like me, it can be a nightmare.
I only posted to tumblr that I was looking for a musical composer and I didn't expect much feedback. But a fan of my previous game posted the ad to a lot of places like reddit and IndieDB. At first I was a little upset by this, but then I realized what a big help this was in finding people. Soon I had over 60 portfolios to sift through and I had to put a cut off date for the submissions. (overwhelming.. overwhelming)
Now I have two very wonderful composers for my game and I kind of suck at keeping them updated (the talking thing..), but they have been very patient with me and so far there have been no problems.
No released game yet but hopefully soon. Never met them irl. This is all over the internet.
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sanwayzar
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« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2016, 02:21:22 PM »

Thank you for sharing, TEETH. Shyness, communication, and time management are common hurdles to overcome, I think.

I also have a certain kind of shyness when it comes to the idea of teaming up with others on a project. Not because of communication - I'm a very good communicator, I like talking with people, and I have no problem approaching them for discussions and gauging interest. For me, the shyness comes from difficulty in trusting people (to do work) - I have a hard time letting myself trust people I haven't worked with before, especially if I also haven't met them IRL, and even more so if they don't have a big portfolio of quality past work to show.
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GAME-O-GAMI: making games with character - http://www.game-o-gami.com/ <br /> <br />My Art Portfolio: http://www.sanhueza.com/
TEETH
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« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2016, 04:33:08 PM »

Yeah there is a certain skill in becoming a team member because it can be difficult to remember that this isn't your project anymore. It's everyone in the team's project now.
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riksteri
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« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2016, 12:14:41 AM »

I've been wondering about the paperwork side of "never met them, online only" collaborations. Contracts, sorting out the rights to use assets, and so on. Different parties might be in different countries, I'd imagine that brings some complications. Is there a common "this is how it's usually done" way of dealing with that?
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sanwayzar
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« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2016, 03:35:33 PM »

I've been wondering about the paperwork side of "never met them, online only" collaborations. Contracts, sorting out the rights to use assets, and so on. Different parties might be in different countries, I'd imagine that brings some complications. Is there a common "this is how it's usually done" way of dealing with that?


I don't think there is a "usually done this way" method, there's likely tons of variations on agreements and contracts, that fit each project and the people working together on them. But there are many examples of contract templates online, for various situations, so you can look up some of those, and then adapt them to your needs (and probably consult a lawyer too if you can afford it.)

I don't have any legal education or experience myself, but I can usually understand everything a contract says, and have adapted them for my own uses of working with freelance artists, for example (paid work, not revenue share.)

And yes, I imagine having parties in several different countries will only complicate things (but only if things go south/get messy.) To be honest, I think legal contracts are only worth the paper they're printed on, unless you can actually afford the very high costs of litigating in court to enforce them. But contracts are still useful for making sure everyone is clear on their responsibilities, their rights, and what SHOULD happen when things work out and when they don't work out. Hopefully, you'll never have to go to court to enforce them.
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GAME-O-GAMI: making games with character - http://www.game-o-gami.com/ <br /> <br />My Art Portfolio: http://www.sanhueza.com/
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