Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

 
Advanced search

1390945 Posts in 66805 Topics- by 59551 Members - Latest Member: LootLocker

April 20, 2021, 05:59:37 AM

Need hosting? Check out Digital Ocean
(more details in this thread)
TIGSource ForumsCommunityDevLogsShadows of Doubt - A First-Person Detective Stealth Game
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 [6]
Print
Author Topic: Shadows of Doubt - A First-Person Detective Stealth Game  (Read 11013 times)
ColePowered
Level 1
*



View Profile WWW
« Reply #100 on: July 24, 2020, 02:18:08 AM »

Thanks GlacierEclipse and McMutton!

It's been another long while since the last update, so here's one.

Doors! What are they good for?! Breaking and entering!

Everybody knows doors are the bane of every game developer's life, so I thought I'd write about how I've been handling them in Shadows. This post may contain what I would consider some mechanical spoilers; that is, a few cool things it may be fun to discover in the game without reading about them first. If that bothers you then it might be best to skip this one.

The reason doors are difficult to get right is that by default, their real-life movement can be fundamentally incompatible with slick feeling first-person movement. The prime culprit is which way they open; in real life double-swinging, doors are pretty rare outside of a western saloon. In games though, we always expect them to open away from the player, so we don't suddenly have a big wad of box collider coming towards us. If you've ever played a game where the doors open towards a player then you may have noticed just how awkward that feels. It's a pretty easy fix though, just make them always open away from the person that opened them.

On the technical side of things, the doors in Shadows also act as my 'culling portals'. As the game is procedurally generated, I had to come up with my own system for handling culling. The game has a lot going on, and there's no way we can render everything in the game at any one time. The solution to this is only to render what the player can see. To help with this, Shadows of doubt breaks everything down into rooms connected with doors (even the streets are behind the scenes treated the same as rooms). Doors act as the portal between them and allows the game to create trees or groups of rooms that should be visible to the player. To cut a very long, quite boring technical explanation short; doors in shadows help me narrow down what can be visible to the player at any one time. Useful!


The game isn't rendering a whole lot behind closed doors.

After getting the basics right it was time to move onto the fun stuff. Film noir loves doors. It loves passing notes under them, listening through them, and even peeking through their dirty keyholes. I wanted this game to celebrate the door too. Here are some cool mechanics and design decisions that I've put in the game to help achieve that:

Opening and closing are pretty simple, but when trespassing your character will automatically do it much more quietly.

You can knock on most doors, and if someone is home they should answer. Unless they're asleep of course, in which case if you keep knocking your character will automatically knock louder until you're banging on the door!


A lot of doors can be locked. If you have the key, you can interact with the handle to lock or unlock it. If you don't have the key, after trying the handle you'll get the option to lock-pick it!

Before you do that though, it's always worth checking around; there might be a hidden spare key under the welcome mat or in a nearby plant!


<p>Lock-picking is fairly straightforward, you just need to focus on the handle to increase the progress bar. You can look away to check if anybody might see you (it's classed as an illegal activity), but the progress bar won't fill. Super cool idea to add in future; brass doorknobs featuring real-time reflections so you can see behind you while lock-picking!


Lock-picks will run out and this display shows you how many you are going to need. They are easily found, however; both paperclips and hair clips can be used as lock-picks and are easily stolen without anyone noticing.

You can peek under doors too! Luckily most doors in the world of Shadows of Doubt are poorly-fitted and have enough of a gap underneath for you to see through! Useful for seeing if someone is home. This actually started as me getting the scale of the actual door a little off, I then realised it would make a cool feature.


More importantly, though, the gap is big enough to pass notes under. What a useful trope!

Last but not least: Is a door in your way? Don't like its flimsy poorly-measured craftmanship? If you sprint towards a door you'll get the option to shoulder-barge it. It might take a few tries depending on its door strength, but it's very cool and sometimes worth it. It may alert the neighbors though, and attract all kinds of unwanted attention!


That's it! It's amazing how much cool functionality you can build around something so ubiquitous. Got any more cool ideas I can put in?
Logged


Detective Immersive Sim Shadows of Doubt | City deck building puzzle game Concrete Jungle
@ColeJefferies
diegzumillo
Level 10
*****


This avatar is so old I still have a some hair


View Profile WWW
« Reply #101 on: July 24, 2020, 07:26:13 AM »

Doors! What are they good for?! Breaking and entering!
Say it again! HOO!

I never thought of doors as being this problematic. Maybe it's because my mind always goes to Thief instead of fast FPS games. Thief embraced doors with all its pace killing attributes. You can even click again on an opening door to leave it half open.
Logged

marcAKAmarc
Level 0
**



View Profile WWW
« Reply #102 on: July 24, 2020, 08:42:32 AM »

Looks awesome.  Subscribing  Hand Any Key
Logged

fuedhq
Level 1
*



View Profile WWW
« Reply #103 on: July 24, 2020, 10:00:36 AM »

Going Ace as usual!
Logged
Prinsessa
Level 10
*****



View Profile WWW
« Reply #104 on: July 24, 2020, 11:41:44 AM »

Very happy to see a new cool update again! Due to spoiler warning I shall be holding off on reading it, but I am excited to mess around with doors in the game in the future!! Blink Blink
Logged

JobLeonard
Level 10
*****



View Profile
« Reply #105 on: July 25, 2020, 01:14:06 AM »

Can't believe I wasn't subbed yet
Logged
ColePowered
Level 1
*



View Profile WWW
« Reply #106 on: July 30, 2020, 11:48:33 AM »

Thanks for the kind words all! :D
Logged


Detective Immersive Sim Shadows of Doubt | City deck building puzzle game Concrete Jungle
@ColeJefferies
Sp1ke
Level 0
***


Mike


View Profile WWW
« Reply #107 on: July 30, 2020, 12:49:29 PM »

Looks very promising. It reminded me of Tex Murphy games.

Best regards
Logged

jg.camarasa
Level 1
*


View Profile
« Reply #108 on: July 31, 2020, 11:26:26 AM »

S
U
B
S
C
R
I
B
I
N
G
Logged

ColePowered
Level 1
*



View Profile WWW
« Reply #109 on: October 24, 2020, 08:47:48 AM »

Hi everybody, there's a fresh video update for you today! This is part one of two, and it's about how I'm going about creating the simulated citizens in Shadows of Doubt.





This is the first part of a dive into the way I've chosen to generate a simulated citizen's personality within the game world. It's been a challenging process, and often for little immediate gain. However, as the game comes together more and more, I'm finally seeing the fruits of this prior hard work.

The real goal of all this is to create a world with procedural characters (and environments) that aren't just window dressing. I'm super excited about the potential of all this as we continue to flesh out the game. In the next video, I'll talk some more about the tools we're using to do this, and show how everything talked about in this video manifests within the game world.
Logged


Detective Immersive Sim Shadows of Doubt | City deck building puzzle game Concrete Jungle
@ColeJefferies
Prinsessa
Level 10
*****



View Profile WWW
« Reply #110 on: October 25, 2020, 01:36:15 PM »

This is just amazing. I really can't wait to play this, it seems like such a cool world to explore, and this stuff is a big part of that. Lovely to see you putting in the extra work to avoid stereotypes too. Kiss
Logged

ColePowered
Level 1
*



View Profile WWW
« Reply #111 on: January 21, 2021, 09:43:32 AM »

2021 is here! It's that time where I look back on the previous year to see how badly I missed my targets! I'm going to avoid being too harsh though, the game is going well and we've achieved a lot this year: The game has been signed by Sold Out, Featured in the PC Gamer PC Gaming Show, and we've had Stark Holborn and Miles join the team as writer and voxel artist respectively.

Quote
Polish up the game with the goal of presenting it at Rezzed in London at the end of March. This means fixing bugs, adding a couple of smaller features and brining stuff that’s ‘half-way done’ up to ‘pretty much done’. Get some more content in there, hopefully, some new characters models and animations along with more environmental items and at least 1 new building to make the city more varied.

Well... EGX Rezzed didn't happen, so there's that. I did get a playable version ready for this, and RPS kindly made a nice video about it. In retrospect though, the game was still too early to show at this point. Sans COVID I would have taken it to Rezzed and probably would have been a little stressed by the number of technical issues. B+.


Quote
Flesh out the gameplay features. CCTV, hacking, tracing phone calls. Foundations of the skill systems and progression. Cool detective stuff that opens up the gameplay.

I did a good chunk of this, and I'm really pleased with the way the CCTV system is going. Nothing is 'complete' standard yet, and won't for a while, but we're getting there. The skill system is something new I've been working on since Xmas so I missed the target date here. B.


The fingerprint system and fingerprint reader is one of the most significant gameplay additions.

Quote
Quarter 3 2020

By this point, I should know if early access by the end of the year is feasible. If it is then it will be a case of adding content throughout this quarter until I feel we have something that’s worth your time and money.

If we are able to hit early access this year, the first build will likely feature the first story mission (already done but not polished), or 2 plus a nearly-complete sandbox experience. By that, I mean enough varied side missions and incentives to progress skills/items. There’s a couple of cool ideas that I’ve kept under wraps in terms of what the player can progress towards, but I’ll write about that another time instead of spoiling it here.

Quote
Quarter 4 2020

Gearing up for EA. Polishing, fixing bugs and adding minor content. Playtesting. IF we don’t hit EA this year, we should by this point at least have a pretty solid date in mind for when that’s achievable.

At Q3 and 4 we still weren't ready for any kind of public playtest. I'm not quite as free as I once was to talk about this kind of thing due to now working with a publisher (I now have to coordinate with professionals!) All I'm going to say is: Stay tuned in 2021, I will be sharing news when things are ready. C+.


The diner is one of many new locations added this year.

What about the stuff we did get done though? There's been a decent amount! The game is starting to look more and more together. We've added the first story chapter, weather system with rain, fingerprints, much improved AI, alarm systems and security turrets, in-game computer systems, big improvements in the simulation, first-person objects and huge numbers of props.


There is still significant ground to cover though. This is a big, ambitious game and although it feels great to now be fully confident in its scope and the boundaries of that, it's a rough, complex beast that will take time to hone and perfect. So what do we want to get done this year?

2021 Goals

  • Citizen visual improvements with various builds, clothes, better detail and faces.
  • A range of to-be-revealed first-person gadgets to aid you in stealth and investigation.
  • Functioning skill system.
  • Revised side missions with more twists and turns.
  • All story chapters fully implemented.
  • Side missions fully implemented.
  • Continue with AI improvements.
  • Expanded world: More things to discover, explore and find.


We're going all out on awesome-looking rain!

There's actually a fair chunk more that I could add to this but I'm going to reveal that when the time comes. I've hope you've enjoyed following along this year, here's to another great year of progress! Be sure to wishlist the game on Steam if you haven't already, and head on over to our Discord server too.
Logged


Detective Immersive Sim Shadows of Doubt | City deck building puzzle game Concrete Jungle
@ColeJefferies
Alain
Level 3
***



View Profile WWW
« Reply #112 on: January 22, 2021, 12:22:39 AM »

Shut up and take my money already!
But seriously, if you hadn't had me hooked with the pure graphics already, you would have had me with the CCTV and hacking. All the best to you and your project, I'll be following the progress!
Logged

Prinsessa
Level 10
*****



View Profile WWW
« Reply #113 on: January 22, 2021, 12:38:20 AM »

Welcome back! Hope you're well. Game is looking better than ever. Kiss I guess the noir setting tricked me into thinking it would be set in an era before computers, so those took me quite by surprise. But I'm all for it. Congrats on publisher stuff!
Logged

JobLeonard
Level 10
*****



View Profile
« Reply #114 on: January 22, 2021, 12:45:25 AM »

The update looks and sounds amazing, looking forward to seeing further progress!
Logged
Schrompf
Level 8
***

C++ professional, game dev sparetime


View Profile WWW
« Reply #115 on: January 22, 2021, 02:35:20 AM »

Art style is still looking great! And I'm thrilled to read that you derailed a bit from the pure procedural approach and plan to incorporate stories. Nothing beats human-made content in my books.
Logged

Snake World, multiplayer worm eats stuff and grows DevLog
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 [6]
Print
Jump to:  

Theme orange-lt created by panic