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December 10, 2019, 10:51:38 PM

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PlainOldGeorge
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« on: April 05, 2019, 09:17:47 AM »

What is the best way to go about getting investors? I have a business plan, presentation, and GDD (game design document) all ready to present as well as some examples of smaller prototypes for different aspects of the game within and out of the powerpoint. My issue at this moment is actually finding anyone to talk to about investing.

This post should help others and myself with this question.

If you are interested at all with investing I do have everything ready to be presented.
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ANtY
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« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2019, 01:51:17 AM »

I think the easiest way would be to go to some gaming events with your game presentation and a prototype ready and meet up with some investors in real life.
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Peterk
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« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2019, 08:42:35 AM »

You're not going to get an investor without a demo or a vertical. You're also going to need a schedule, break-even analysis, and a team composition document within a pitch deck.

Also, what kind of investor? Most investors take a piece of your company, a few will consider royalties on the project (and you'll have to be an experienced developer with a string of completed titles and a demo to get them interested).
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yanrov
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« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2019, 11:05:57 PM »

I would suggest looking at how indie films are financed. The basic idea is two make two companies, an LLC to protect you, and the LLC forms a limited partnership with up to 35 silent-partner investors. Your prospectus outlines your film/game, and what you think the revenue will be. Then you offer buy in deals where people who give you money earlier in the venture get a higher % return on their investment, and people who leave the money in the longest get a higher % return.

So if someone gives you $10k up front, you offer a +10% return, if they take their return last, you give another +10% return. So if someone gives you $10k early, and takes their profits last, they get a +20% return.  If they put it in early, and took it out early, they only get a +10% return. Except since they will probably lose their money, they expect +100% deals (double their money).

You can also sell Executive Producer credits in the game for maybe $1k a piece, with a limit of 5 EPs. Maybe $10k per EP, whatever you can get.  Trade a game credit for voice-work or free rent, be creative!  After you pay off everyone, your LLC gets the rest of the money, forever. 

If you make a profitable game, make some people some money, they will want in on your next one.  And probably for a heckuva lot more than the put in the first one. If they try take creative control (as happens in indie films), point out they don't have LLC protection, and will have unlimited liabilities if they become a non-silent partner.

A course in film production will cover all this, should apply exactly to games. I don't know why more people don't do it if they have the development skills.
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ANtY
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« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2019, 12:17:09 AM »

I think the best options will be making awareness and Repeating the relationship again and again.
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@yanrov: that sounds like a pretty cool idea, although it also sounds like a lot of additional work on top of making the game.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2019, 07:53:05 AM by ThemsAllTook » Logged

yanrov
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« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2019, 02:38:07 PM »

It is a lot of work, and that is part of the vetting process.
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TonyLi
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« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2019, 06:50:37 AM »

Peterk's advice shouldn't get lost. Don't look for an investor until you have a playable demo or vertical. You'll be wasting everyone's time, including your own, because no one will talk to you without a demo. The only exception is the occasional government grant, but those have other requirements such as being in a special demographic such as military veterans or having a strong history of shipped games.
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