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October 22, 2019, 09:30:57 AM

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TIGSource ForumsDeveloperTechnical (Moderator: ThemsAllTook)How to start in game dev (Programmer)
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jotap
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« on: May 31, 2019, 05:08:18 AM »

Hello people, don't know if this is the correct place to post this but here I go.

 

I'm João, a 24 years old Portuguese dude currently working in Deloitte and have a master degree in computer engineering, I've always had a passion for game development and created two games during my years of university, both for android one AR the other VR using Unity. I have a broad knowledge of a lot of programming languages and love to learn.

 

Now what you have came to, I want to start my carer in game development, in a few months I want to dismiss myself and try and get work in a game company and after that switch to a huge game company.

Until there I want to create a portfolio, but needed your help.

 

I'm creating some articles about my roadmap, there I will talk about what I learned and all the things I've done to create my portfolio, I want to create this for the next guy that wants to become a game dev, should I do it?

Who I should talk to? I've send several messages to guys in Linkedin and waiting for responses.

What should I learn (UE, Unity, Cpp)? Should I take a course? Should I read a book?

 

Thanks guys and from now on I want to become a recurring user of this forum
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fluffrabbit
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« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2019, 07:05:26 AM »

Hey jotap,

I'm a 26-year-old American indie "game developer" with no degree and very little good experience in the field, but I have plenty of bad experience to share.

Around TIGSource, the "hot" engines seem to be Unity and Phaser.js. Not a lot of people around here use Unreal. (Maybe because of the cost?) C++ is a language, and knowing a language always helps, but you need to consider how you will use that language. You seem to be more of a game engine guy at this point, so I would recommend sticking with game engines for the time being. If you want to use a C++ game engine specifically, I have heard good things about Panda3D, but I can't personally vouch for at as I have yet to use it.

In terms of reading materials, that will depend on where your interest lies. If your interest is in graphics programming, the PBR book now has a free online edition. I would also recommend the OpenGL ES Programming Guide, version 3.0 or later. Vulkan is coming, so look for material on that as well if you're doing graphics programming.

You've had enough college, so if you like academia you should pursue a PhD. In terms of learning game programming, you learn that on the street. Find a tool you're comfortable with and hack, hack, hack. Switch gears every couple of years so you don't get stuck using the same version of the same language with no way to stop. Keep it fresh, stay positive, and do projects.
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Ordnas
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« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2019, 03:43:01 AM »

I think the reason to not using Unreal is because it requires more hardware power to run instead of Unity (check create a C++ source code in Unreal). If you already know some programming languages, just pick up Unity or Unreal Engine and learn from their tutorials Wink
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fluffrabbit
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« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2019, 09:03:50 AM »

I think the reason to not using Unreal is because it requires more hardware power to run instead of Unity (check create a C++ source code in Unreal). If you already know some programming languages, just pick up Unity or Unreal Engine and learn from their tutorials Wink
And don't forget the open source stuff as well. Ogre3D if you just want graphics, Panda3D if you want graphics and game stuff, Godot if you want a Unity clone (though Unity really is better), and if you're a JavaScripter there are lots of interesting options. Just today I discovered the Planck 2D physics engine.

It's a lonely occupation. Pick whichever option eases the pain.
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AlienplayGames
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« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2019, 12:40:47 AM »

I'm creating some articles about my roadmap, there I will talk about what I learned and all the things I've done to create my portfolio, I want to create this for the next guy that wants to become a game dev, should I do it?

Definitely! These articles will show off your experience better than anything else and you'll also help other people. It's a win-win. There's no reason not to do this.

Btw, can you send me the link to those articles. I'm interested to read them. Thanks.  Coffee
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« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2019, 10:56:21 PM »

If you aim for a bigger studio, C++ is a must. But most seem so use C# for tools, too, and quite a lot of smaller games are done in Unity, just like seemingly all of the indies. So do some fun projects in Unity, maybe one that you push through all loops to get a feel what's required to actually finish a game. And do some programming to refresh your C++ knowledge - a lot is going on in C++ lately, and some game studios make good use of it, while others prohibit pretty much everything modern for $REASON
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Prinsessa
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« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2019, 07:59:35 AM »

At least for me, Unity has proven very useful. I use C++ for my personal stuff, but all the jobs I’ve found have been Unity. It definitely opens up a lot of doors, at least where I am.
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InfiniteStateMachine
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« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2019, 04:25:12 PM »

You seem like skill-wise you are already very close. You're definitely going to want to brush up on c++ though. Also be comfortable not using the STL etc. For what it's worth, IMO every game company specific standard library I've used was vastly superior for game development so it's not such a big deal.

I suspect the reason Unreal isn't used as much is it has a huge initial conceptual learning curve. Once you're past that though it's one of my favorite engines.
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qMopey
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« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2019, 07:17:32 AM »

If you want to make games then just do it. Pick any tool you think sounds fun and go with that. There are many ways to make games and the only way to learn about them is to try them.

If your goal is to make games professionally then C++ and Unity are both popular options right now.

I myself don't like Unity, and just do C++ stuff. But to each their own.
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fluffrabbit
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« Reply #9 on: June 19, 2019, 09:33:28 AM »

Real programmers can decide on the best tool for the job. If a business expects programmers to use something that you determine to be practically unsuitable, they do not deserve your labor. As a principle, something being popular, whatever it may be, does not necessarily make it better.
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Ordnas
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« Reply #10 on: June 20, 2019, 01:31:25 AM »

If you need a job for living you will use  the tool that the company wants/has.
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ProgramGamer
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« Reply #11 on: June 20, 2019, 03:47:44 AM »

Yep, I'm siding with Ordnas here. Use the tools the company wants you to use. You can always propose an alternative of course, but be aware that unless the project is in its very early days, the cost of migrating everything to the new language/tool means your proposal will almost certainly be rejected.

I'm actually working with a less than ideal tool for my current job, and while I absolutely hate it, the reason they hired me in the first place is ultimately to complete something that was already started, and the cost of switching tools would be too great and uncertain (we don't know if anything else would actually be better).

So yeah, insisting on using your preferred tools is generally not a great idea, especially mid-project.
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fluffrabbit
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« Reply #12 on: June 20, 2019, 03:57:40 AM »

I agree that one should not switch mid-project, and I also agree that a company that advances the state of the art with their own engine is worth working for.

What bugs me is when the mid-size studios start a new project and default to a popular third-party engine that they lack a significant code investment in, then expect all applicants to have experience with said popular engine because <argumentum ad populum>. I had a chat with someone at a studio I won't name who proudly wore that tribal costume because of what it did for his ego. So I guess I have a grudge.
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