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September 18, 2019, 03:09:05 PM

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TIGSource ForumsPlayerGeneralGetting into video game development.
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thisisakki
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« on: August 29, 2019, 01:51:03 AM »

Hello everyone,
i stumbled on this forum while learning about video game development and tbh to download free sprites.
i've been using construct 2 and learning my way on the pure basics as i am very new to this.
i was hoping that i could get some good advice here on were to look for study material and assets to make games.
any kind of suggestion is appreciated as i will only learn new things so please go ahead and bestow some wisdom on this lad.
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fluffrabbit
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« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2019, 02:48:16 AM »

There are plenty of free sprites at opengameart.org.

I would recommend avoiding Construct at all costs. Even GameMaker, which is terrible, provides greater flexibility. If you have programming experience outside of games, it might be useful to try to make a game in the language you know. Eventually you should learn C or something similar and use that.
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Cobralad
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« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2019, 03:00:12 AM »

Eventually you should learn C or something similar and use that.
have you ever made a complete videogame
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ProgramGamer
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« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2019, 03:56:54 AM »

Sorry thisisakki, discussions like these often turn into arguments about what tools are the best/worst, hence the jab at C above. Gentlemen, let's not let this thread turn into that please.

My personal advice to you is to start by learning the very basics of programming (such as following an online course) and then to use that knowledge to make several small games with several popular engines like GameMaker, Construct, Unity. The point of this is to find out for yourself what you're most comfortable using in the long run. It doesn't really matter what language you learn first, but it does matter that you take a good course. Fortunately, there's many reputable websites for this sort of thing nowadays such as Coursera and Udemy. I would personally recommend finding a course that uses Python to teach topics such as algorithms and data stuctures.

There will be a decent amount of upfront learning no matter which path you take though, mostly because you'll be learning programming at the same time as game design. However, once you're past the initial technical hurdle, I can confidently say that making games will be a very fulfilling endeavor, even if you just do it as a hobby. So please don't give up if it seems hard at first, because it does get easier and more fun!

So yeah, go try stuff and don't hesitate to ask more questions!
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fluffrabbit
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« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2019, 04:21:39 AM »

No hard feelings, Cobralad raises a good point. No, I have never made a complete videogame in C. The memory management alone can take a bite out of development time. But C++ and various high-level frameworks that sit atop C are quite productive.

The last time I brought a game to the point of publishing, several of today's tools didn't exist yet and a custom JavaScript framework was all I used. Nowadays I'm taking it easy with development schedules.

Quote
My personal advice to you is to start by learning the very basics of programming

Why assume OP can't already program?
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ProgramGamer
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« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2019, 04:59:06 AM »

Mostly because they said this:

[...]i am very new to this[...]

and requested our advice.
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fluffrabbit
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« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2019, 05:22:40 AM »

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as i will only learn new things

OK, yeah, definitely.

This is getting really meta.
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woodsmoke
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« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2019, 11:00:19 AM »

Watch a few Construct YouTube tutorials. (Or maybe there are tutorials in the Construct software?)

You get better by putting in work and creating stuff. Learn from the manual and/or search google.

Don't start with small games. Start with tiny games.
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michaelplzno
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« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2019, 06:56:05 PM »

The very first games I made were in Basic on a TI-82 calculator, which came with a manual that was easy enough. To some extent, you are going to have to be the driving force behind the things you create, so its hard to offer concrete direction when you have your own path to follow. In games there are a million starting locations and a million destinations so if you are inclined to math you can imagine there are a lot of different paths. It helps to know where you are and where you want to be, which figuring that out is a big part of it.

I do wish I could just drop a video of "HERE IS THE FIRST THING" but I'm not sure what the best stuff is to get into it now. Personally I like the Unity engine which has a large amount of support material as to how to use it, but some basic Object Oriented Programing ideas will help with that.

Just FYI, the very first language I learned in college was C, and I think Sid Meier uses it to this day though yes, its not used too much anymore.
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