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TIGSource ForumsPlayerGamesMade-up difficulty of competitive games
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meanwhale
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« on: September 13, 2020, 06:48:38 AM »

"Too many things to do in too short a time..."
I started writing about the difficulty in MOBA's. Go check it out at my web page:
https://the-meanwhale.web.app/?p=moba

INTRO:

 In short, they make it difficult by giving you too many things to do in too short a time. Tasks can vary from simple ones, like waiting a cooldown to end before casting a spell again, to more complex, like planning your build strategy according to your opponent team composition.

As there’s not enough time, you have to prioritize, according to your dexterity and strategic skills. A grand master player with superior skills can accomplish many times more in a given time than a novice who struggles to keep up with even the most basic things. To do your best, you have to prioritize the overwhelming amount of tasks according to your dexterity, (mouse) accuracy, tactical and strategic skills. Also, things like your competitiveness, motivation, and current energy level play their roles. After all, you suppose to be having fun playing games on your precious spare time, so you don't want to play on full throttle all the time!

In addition to having too much to do, you have your team mates who you can’t control. Team members have their roles (e.g. DPS, tank, and support), and they are expected to play accordingly. Healer character who wants to make suicide attacks to enemy backline instead of healing can ruin the match for the whole team. Therefore the team goodness is measured by how well they can hold up the house of cards (of roles) rather than the sum of players’ skill.

More... https://the-meanwhale.web.app/?p=moba
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michaelplzno
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« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2020, 06:43:43 PM »

I'm all for more causal experiences. The mark of great design is a game that can be played on different levels: you can be casual and take it easy, like playing tennis to just see how long you can keep the ball going, or you can play at a championship level, like Wimbledon. The key to doing this is usually to let the player have control of how sophisticated an experience they want. For example with pool/snooker, the ideal setup would let players choose the dimensions of things when they start (which is physically impossible) but the best version of that game system would allow for players to dynamically adjust the game based on how good they are. For example in golf, people have a "handicap" where their score is adjusted so they can play against each other.

As much as the people who were pushing "flow" in games were not my kind of people, you might want to look up the concept. But I do think that fun experiences allow the player to pick their poison so to speak.
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meanwhale
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« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2020, 05:54:21 AM »

You could think team balancing in some games like a handicap. Then noobs and pros can play the same battle. But I think that works only with bigger teams, like 32 vs. 32 in Battlefield games.

If you want a competitive game to be casual, then the luck factor has to be bigger and carefully built-in.
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